Tag Archives: Occupational Health

Straight, No Chaser: Female Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

femrep1

Considerations of female reproductive health are important in the work environment. Many different work settings pose risks to women’s reproductive systems. Generally effects can be divided into those impacting a women’s reproductive system itself and those impacting the well-being of a pregnancy or baby. An additionally important point is these risks to the female reproductive system often bring consequences to one’s overall health.

simpons-toxic-labels

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s reproductive health?

  • Chemicals such as pesticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), carbon disulfide or organic solvents can disrupt the menstrual cycle and female hormone production. If you suffer from irregular periods, consider whether any work-related exposure could be a contributor.
  • Approximately 10-15% of couples are infertile. Workplace chemical exposures can produce damage to a woman’s eggs (or a man’s sperm), and they can cause changes to female hormones with subsequent drop-offs in the ability to produce a normal menstrual cycle and have normal uterine growth.

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s general health as a result of impacting reproductive health?

  • Remember that hormones affect other parts of your body and health other than your reproductive system. Therefore even if you aren’t concerned with becoming pregnant, cause for concern still exists. Imbalances of estrogen and progesterone caused by some workplace exposures can also increase your risk to:
    • Cancers such as endometrial or breast
    • Heart disease
    • Osteoporosis
    • Symptoms of menopause
    • Tissue loss or weakening

femrep5

How do workplace hazards pose risks during pregnancy?

  • It should come as no surprise that certain exposures can cause birth defects or miscarriages. You should be aware of the timing of exposures and subsequent potential effects. Exposure during the first 3 months of pregnancy might cause a birth defect or a miscarriage. Exposure during the last 6 months of pregnancy could slow the baby’s growth, affect its brain development, or cause premature labor.

Breastfeeding-600x330

How do workplace hazards pose risks to babies?
Some chemicals can get into breast milk and others can be transmitted to infants through contact occurring on a parents clothes, skin or hair. Of course, not all chemicals get into breast milk, and not all chemicals that do will harm your baby. Here are a few chemicals that can get into breast milk:

  • Chemicals from smoke, fires, or tobacco
  • Heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury)
  • Organic solvents and volatile organic chemicals (e.g. bromochloroethane, dioxane, formaldehyde and perchloroethylene)
  • Radioactive chemicals used in hospitals for radiation therapy (e.g as Iodine-131)

Some harmful chemicals have been measured in breast milk at levels that could harm the baby. Lead is one example. Lead in breast milk can harm a baby’s brain. If you work with lead, ask your doctor to measure your blood lead level to see if there is too much lead in your body to safely breastfeed your baby.

For all of these considerations, talk to your employer or your workplace safety officer about ways you can reduce or eliminate your exposure. This might include using personal protective equipment (PPE) or changing your work duties. If you use gloves, protective clothing, a respirator, or other PPE, be sure they are right for you and the chemical to which you are exposed.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Male Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

saddle

Yes, you read that correctly. We’re discussing men’s reproductive health. Of course there is a preoccupation with women’s reproductive health (and we addressed that in another Straight, No Chaser, but men also need to be aware of conditions in their work environment that can have adverse effects on their ability to have healthy children. Knowledge of these conditions is a necessary first step toward implementing workplace changes that can keep you safe and healthy.
Let’s share a brief list of common reproductive hazards up front for you to see.

  • Chemicals and solvents
  • Cigarettes
  • Drugs (legal and illegal)
  • Heat
  • Pesticides
  • Radiation
  • Traumatic risks

An unfortunate consideration in discussing this topic is most potential hazards have not and will not ever be studied to fully understand their effects on humans; it would simply be unethical to conduct such studies. That said, over 1000 chemicals used in the workplace have been shown to have adverse effects on the reproductive health of animals.

workforce

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, I’m listing known reproductive problems and workplace hazards demonstrated to cause those problems. Most of you who work in environments featuring any of the aforementioned reproductive hazards are aware of the presence of certain chemicals, pesticides, solvents and others substances being used. Review the hazards. If these are common in your workplace, engage your employee health representative to discuss precautions that are and/or should be in place to minimize your exposure and risk. Make sure you’re fully protected. It is important to note that I’m describing risk here. These effects do not routinely occur in every worker at just any level of exposure. Whether or not an exposure will cause a reproductive problem depends on the amount of time you’re exposed, the amount of the hazard you’re exposed to, how you were exposed and how your body reacts to the hazard. Because every hazard has not been studied for its effects in humans, this list cannot possibly be complete. Always fully engage in workplace safety.
Here are examples of male reproductive hazards and workplace exposures associated with them:

male repro health risks

  • Low hormone levels: insecticides, lead, organophosphate, DDE, manganese, phthalates
  • Low number of sperm: lead, diesel exhaust, pesticide, bisphenol A, organophosphate, chromium, paraquat/malathion
  • Irregular sperm shape: insecticides, lead, carbon disulfide, pesticides, bisphenol A, petrochemical, carbofuran, nickel
  • Irregular sperm genetics: phthalates, styrene, organophosphate, carbaryl, fenvalerate, lead, benzene
  • Chemicals in semen: lead, trichloroethylene, boron, cadmium
  • Low amount of semen: lead, organophosphate, paraquat/malathion
  • Low number of swimming sperm: insecticides, diesel exhaust, lead, carbon disulfide, phthalates, pesticides, bisphenol A, fenvalerate, petrochemical, welding, N, N-dimethylformamide, abamectin, paraquat/malathion
  • Lower sex drive: carbon disulfide, bisphenol A
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED): bisphenol A, bicycle saddles
  • Lower penis sensitivity: bicycle saddles
  • Lower ejaculation quality: bisphenol A

workplace risk assessment

If you are not familiar with the substances just listed but know that you work in an environment with hazardous materials, consider printing out the page and taking it to your job. Ask your safety officer if your workplace exposes you to any of these substances and if so, what protections are in place for workers.
As a final consideration, be aware that many of these substances can be transported out of the work environment back to your home or other locations, exposing others. Be mindful to take the extra step to protect yourself and others by avoiding prolonged and unnecessary exposures to workplace hazards.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: An Overview of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

workplace danger

Many of us work in fields in which it is accurate to state “My job makes me sick!” Occupational illnesses and injuries take a massive toll on us. Whether we’re describing exposure to chemicals, workplace injuries, or workplace hazards and diseases, the number of cases of occupational injuries and illnesses has become so prevalent that occurrences are factored into job planning.

workplace_illness3 asbestos

Consider the following dreadful statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics for the year 2016.

  • A total of 5,190 fatal work injuries were recorded in the United States in 2016, a 7% increase from the 4,836 fatal injuries reported in 2015.
  • There were approximately 2.9 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses reported by private industry employers in 2016, which occurred at a rate of 3.0 cases per 100 equivalent full-time workers.

It should go without saying that there is a massive financial toll associated with this loss of life and function. The annual cost in the US for occupational injuries and illnesses is estimated at $192 billion dollars, inclusive of workers’ compensation and other insurance claims, medical expenses and other associated healthcare costs (e.g. physical and occupational therapy, home health, etc.), lost wages and productivity.

workplace illness

Additional Straight, No Chaser posts will focus on some of the more common and concerning aspects of occupational illnesses and injuries, including the following:

  • Anthrax
  • Back pain
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Depression in the Workplace
  • Electrical Safety
  • Fall Injuries
  • Flu in the Workplace
  • Noise Exposure
  • Poisonous Plants
  • Reproductive Health in the Workplace
  • Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
    Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
    Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
    Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Male Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

saddle

Yes, you read that correctly. We’re discussing men’s reproductive health. Of course there is a preoccupation with women’s reproductive health (and we addressed that in another Straight, No Chaser, but men also need to be aware of conditions in their work environment that can have adverse effects on their ability to have healthy children. Knowledge of these conditions is a necessary first step toward implementing workplace changes that can keep you safe and healthy.
Let’s share a brief list of common reproductive hazards up front for you to see.

  • Chemicals and solvents
  • Cigarettes
  • Drugs (legal and illegal)
  • Heat
  • Pesticides
  • Radiation
  • Traumatic risks

An unfortunate consideration in discussing this topic is most potential hazards have not and will not ever be studied to fully understand their effects on humans; it would simply be unethical to conduct such studies. That said, over 1000 chemicals used in the workplace have been shown to have adverse effects on the reproductive health of animals.

workforce

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, I’m listing known reproductive problems and workplace hazards demonstrated to cause those problems. Most of you who work in environments featuring any of the aforementioned reproductive hazards are aware of the presence of certain chemicals, pesticides, solvents and others substances being used. Review the hazards. If these are common in your workplace, engage your employee health representative to discuss precautions that are and/or should be in place to minimize your exposure and risk. Make sure you’re fully protected. It is important to note that I’m describing risk here. These effects do not routinely occur in every worker at just any level of exposure. Whether or not an exposure will cause a reproductive problem depends on the amount of time you’re exposed, the amount of the hazard you’re exposed to, how you were exposed and how your body reacts to the hazard. Because every hazard has not been studied for its effects in humans, this list cannot possibly be complete. Always fully engage in workplace safety.
Here are examples of male reproductive hazards and workplace exposures associated with them:

male repro health risks

  • Low hormone levels: insecticides, lead, organophosphate, DDE, manganese, phthalates
  • Low number of sperm: lead, diesel exhaust, pesticide, bisphenol A, organophosphate, chromium, paraquat/malathion
  • Irregular sperm shape: insecticides, lead, carbon disulfide, pesticides, bisphenol A, petrochemical, carbofuran, nickel
  • Irregular sperm genetics: phthalates, styrene, organophosphate, carbaryl, fenvalerate, lead, benzene
  • Chemicals in semen: lead, trichloroethylene, boron, cadmium
  • Low amount of semen: lead, organophosphate, paraquat/malathion
  • Low number of swimming sperm: insecticides, diesel exhaust, lead, carbon disulfide, phthalates, pesticides, bisphenol A, fenvalerate, petrochemical, welding, N, N-dimethylformamide, abamectin, paraquat/malathion
  • Lower sex drive: carbon disulfide, bisphenol A
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED): bisphenol A, bicycle saddles
  • Lower penis sensitivity: bicycle saddles
  • Lower ejaculation quality: bisphenol A

workplace risk assessment

If you are not familiar with the substances just listed but know that you work in an environment with hazardous materials, consider printing out the page and taking it to your job. Ask your safety officer if your workplace exposes you to any of these substances and if so, what protections are in place for workers.
As a final consideration, be aware that many of these substances can be transported out of the work environment back to your home or other locations, exposing others. Be mindful to take the extra step to protect yourself and others by avoiding prolonged and unnecessary exposures to workplace hazards.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 

Straight, No Chaser: Female Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

femrep1

Considerations of female reproductive health are important in the work environment. Many different work settings pose risks to women’s reproductive systems. Generally effects can be divided into those impacting a women’s reproductive system itself and those impacting the well-being of a pregnancy or baby. An additionally important point is these risks to the female reproductive system often bring consequences to one’s overall health.

simpons-toxic-labels

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s reproductive health?

  • Chemicals such as pesticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), carbon disulfide or organic solvents can disrupt the menstrual cycle and female hormone production. If you suffer from irregular periods, consider whether any work-related exposure could be a contributor.
  • Approximately 10-15% of couples are infertile. Workplace chemical exposures can produce damage to a woman’s eggs (or a man’s sperm), and they can cause changes to female hormones with subsequent drop-offs in the ability to produce a normal menstrual cycle and have normal uterine growth.

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s general health as a result of impacting reproductive health?

  • Remember that hormones affect other parts of your body and health other than your reproductive system. Therefore even if you aren’t concerned with becoming pregnant, cause for concern still exists. Imbalances of estrogen and progesterone caused by some workplace exposures can also increase your risk to:
    • Cancers such as endometrial or breast
    • Heart disease
    • Osteoporosis
    • Symptoms of menopause
    • Tissue loss or weakening

femrep5

How do workplace hazards pose risks during pregnancy?

  • It should come as no surprise that certain exposures can cause birth defects or miscarriages. You should be aware of the timing of exposures and subsequent potential effects. Exposure during the first 3 months of pregnancy might cause a birth defect or a miscarriage. Exposure during the last 6 months of pregnancy could slow the baby’s growth, affect its brain development, or cause premature labor.

Breastfeeding-600x330

How do workplace hazards pose risks to babies?
Some chemicals can get into breast milk and others can be transmitted to infants through contact occurring on a parents clothes, skin or hair. Of course, not all chemicals get into breast milk, and not all chemicals that do will harm your baby. Here are a few chemicals that can get into breast milk:

  • Chemicals from smoke, fires, or tobacco
  • Heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury)
  • Organic solvents and volatile organic chemicals (e.g. bromochloroethane, dioxane, formaldehyde and perchloroethylene)
  • Radioactive chemicals used in hospitals for radiation therapy (e.g as Iodine-131)

Some harmful chemicals have been measured in breast milk at levels that could harm the baby. Lead is one example. Lead in breast milk can harm a baby’s brain. If you work with lead, ask your doctor to measure your blood lead level to see if there is too much lead in your body to safely breastfeed your baby.

For all of these considerations, talk to your employer or your workplace safety officer about ways you can reduce or eliminate your exposure. This might include using personal protective equipment (PPE) or changing your work duties. If you use gloves, protective clothing, a respirator, or other PPE, be sure they are right for you and the chemical to which you are exposed.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 

Straight, No Chaser: An Overview of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

workplace danger

Many of us work in fields in which it is accurate to state “My job makes me sick!” Occupational illnesses and injuries take a massive toll on us. Whether we’re describing exposure to chemicals, workplace injuries, or workplace hazards and diseases, the number of cases of occupational injuries and illnesses has become so prevalent that occurrences are factored into job planning.

workplace_illness3 asbestos

Consider the following dreadful statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics for the year 2015.

  • A total of 4,836 fatal work injuries were recorded in the United States in 2015, a slight increase from the 4,821 fatal injuries reported in 2014.
  • There were approximately 2.9 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses reported by private industry employers in 2015, which occurred at a rate of 3.0 cases per 100 equivalent full-time workers.

It should go without saying that there is a massive financial toll associated with this loss of life and function. The annual cost in the US for occupational injuries and illnesses is estimated at $192 billion dollars, inclusive of workers’ compensation and other insurance claims, medical expenses and other associated healthcare costs (e.g. physical and occupational therapy, home health, etc.), lost wages and productivity.

workplace illness

Additional Straight, No Chaser posts will focus on some of the more common and concerns aspects of occupational illnesses and injuries, including the following:

  • Anthrax
  • Back pain
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Depression in the Workplace
  • Electrical Safety
  • Fall Injuries
  • Flu in the Workplace
  • Noise Exposure
  • Poisonous Plants
  • Reproductive Health in the Workplace

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 

Straight, No Chaser: Male Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

saddle

Yes, you read that correctly. We’re discussing men’s reproductive health. Of course there is a preoccupation with women’s reproductive health (and we addressed that in another Straight, No Chaser, but men also need to be aware of conditions in their work environment that can have adverse effects on their ability to have healthy children. Knowledge of these conditions is a necessary first step toward implementing workplace changes that can keep you safe and healthy.
Let’s share a brief list of common reproductive hazards up front for you to see.

  • Chemicals and solvents
  • Cigarettes
  • Drugs (legal and illegal)
  • Heat
  • Pesticides
  • Radiation
  • Traumatic risks

An unfortunate consideration in discussing this topic is most potential hazards have not and will not ever be studied to fully understand their effects on humans; it would simply be unethical to conduct such studies. That said, over 1000 chemicals used in the workplace have been shown to have adverse effects on the reproductive health of animals.

workforce

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, I’m listing known reproductive problems and workplace hazards demonstrated to cause those problems. Most of you who work in environments featuring any of the aforementioned reproductive hazards are aware of the presence of certain chemicals, pesticides, solvents and others substances being used. Review the hazards. If these are common in your workplace, engage your employee health representative to discuss precautions that are and/or should be in place to minimize your exposure and risk. Make sure you’re fully protected. It is important to note that I’m describing risk here. These effects do not routinely occur in every worker at just any level of exposure. Whether or not an exposure will cause a reproductive problem depends on the amount of time you’re exposed, the amount of the hazard you’re exposed to, how you were exposed and how your body reacts to the hazard. Because every hazard has not been studied for its effects in humans, this list cannot possibly be complete. Always fully engage in workplace safety.
Here are examples of male reproductive hazards and workplace exposures associated with them:

male repro health risks

  • Low hormone levels: insecticides, lead, organophosphate, DDE, manganese, phthalates
  • Low number of sperm: lead, diesel exhaust, pesticide, bisphenol A, organophosphate, chromium, paraquat/malathion
  • Irregular sperm shape: insecticides, lead, carbon disulfide, pesticides, bisphenol A, petrochemical, carbofuran, nickel
  • Irregular sperm genetics: phthalates, styrene, organophosphate, carbaryl, fenvalerate, lead, benzene
  • Chemicals in semen: lead, trichloroethylene, boron, cadmium
  • Low amount of semen: lead, organophosphate, paraquat/malathion
  • Low number of swimming sperm: insecticides, diesel exhaust, lead, carbon disulfide, phthalates, pesticides, bisphenol A, fenvalerate, petrochemical, welding, N, N-dimethylformamide, abamectin, paraquat/malathion
  • Lower sex drive: carbon disulfide, bisphenol A
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED): bisphenol A, bicycle saddles
  • Lower penis sensitivity: bicycle saddles
  • Lower ejaculation quality: bisphenol A

workplace risk assessment

If you are not familiar with the substances just listed but know that you work in an environment with hazardous materials, consider printing out the page and taking it to your job. Ask your safety officer if your workplace exposes you to any of these substances and if so, what protections are in place for workers.
As a final consideration, be aware that many of these substances can be transported out of the work environment back to your home or other locations, exposing others. Be mindful to take the extra step to protect yourself and others by avoiding prolonged and unnecessary exposures to workplace hazards.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Female Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

femrep1

Considerations of female reproductive health are important in the work environment. Many different work settings pose risks to women’s reproductive systems. Generally effects can be divided into those impacting a women’s reproductive system itself and those impacting the wellbeing of a pregnancy or baby. An additionally important point is these risks to the female reproductive system often bring consequences to one’s overall health.

simpons-toxic-labels

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s reproductive health?

  • Chemicals such as pesticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), carbon disulfide or organic solvents can disrupt the menstrual cycle and female hormone production. If you suffer from irregular periods, consider whether any work-related exposure could be a contributor.
  • Approximately 10-15% of couples are infertile. Workplace chemical exposures can produce damage to a woman’s eggs (or a man’s sperm), and they can cause changes to female hormones with subsequent drop-offs in the ability to produce a normal menstrual cycle and have normal uterine growth.

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s general health as a result of impacting reproductive health?

  • Remember that hormones affect other parts of your body and health other than your reproductive system. Therefore even if you aren’t concerned with becoming pregnant, cause for concern still exists. Imbalances of estrogen and progesterone caused by some workplace exposures can also increase your risk to:
    • Cancers such as endometrial or breast
    • Heart disease
    • Osteoporosis
    • Symptoms of menopause
    • Tissue loss or weakening

femrep5

How do workplace hazards pose risks during pregnancy?

  • It should come as no surprise that certain exposures can cause birth defects or miscarriages. You should be aware of the timing of exposures and subsequent potential effects. Exposure during the first 3 months of pregnancy might cause a birth defect or a miscarriage. Exposure during the last 6 months of pregnancy could slow the baby’s growth, affect its brain development, or cause premature labor.

Breastfeeding-600x330

How do workplace hazards pose risks to babies?
Some chemicals can get into breast milk and others can be transmitted to infants through contact occurring on a parents clothes, skin or hair. Of course, not all chemicals get into breast milk, and not all chemicals that do will harm your baby. Here are a few chemicals that can get into breast milk:

  • Chemicals from smoke, fires, or tobacco
  • Heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury)
  • Organic solvents and volatile organic chemicals (e.g. bromochloroethane, dioxane, formaldehyde and perchloroethylene)
  • Radioactive chemicals used in hospitals for radiation therapy (e.g as Iodine-131)

Some harmful chemicals have been measured in breast milk at levels that could harm the baby. Lead is one example. Lead in breast milk can harm a baby’s brain. If you work with lead, ask your doctor to measure your blood lead level to see if there is too much lead in your body to safely breastfeed your baby.

For all of these considerations, talk to your employer or your workplace safety officer about ways you can reduce or eliminate your exposure. This might include using personal protective equipment (PPE) or changing your work duties. If you use gloves, protective clothing, a respirator, or other PPE, be sure they are right for you and the chemical to which you are exposed.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: An Overview of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

workplace danger

Many of us work in fields in which it is accurate to state “My job makes me sick!” Occupational illnesses and injuries take a massive toll on us. Whether we’re describing exposure to chemicals, workplace injuries, or workplace hazards and diseases, the number of cases of occupational injuries and illnesses has become so prevalent that occurrences are factored into job planning.

workplace_illness3 asbestos

Consider the following dreadful statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics for the year 2012.

  • More than 4,383 U.S. workers died from occupational injuries. That is twelve deaths directly related to work every day in the U.S.
  • It is estimated that 49,000 deaths occur annually from work-related illness – 134 deaths per day.
  • It is estimated that 3.8 million U.S. workers had a nonfatal occupational injury or illness in 2012.
  • Approximately 3 millions emergency room visits occur annually from occupational injuries.
  • Approximately 150,000 hospitalizations occur annually from occupational injuries.

It should go without saying that there is a massive financial toll associated with this loss of life and function. The annual cost in the US for occupational injuries and illnesses is estimated at $192 billion dollars, inclusive of workers’ compensation and other insurance claims, medical expenses and other associated healthcare costs (e.g. physical and occupational therapy, home health, etc.), lost wages and productivity.

workplace illness

Additional Straight, No Chaser posts will focus on some of the more common and concerns aspects of occupational illnesses and injuries, including the following:

  • Anthrax
  • Back pain
  • Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Depression in the Workplace
  • Electrical Safety
  • Fall Injuries
  • Flu in the Workplace
  • Noise Exposure
  • Poisonous Plants
  • Reproductive Health in the Workplace

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
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Straight, No Chaser: Male Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

saddle

Yes, you read that correctly. We’re discussing men’s reproductive health. Of course there is a preoccupation with women’s reproductive health (and we addressed that in another Straight, No Chaser, but men also need to be aware of conditions in their work environment that can have adverse effects on their ability to have healthy children. Knowledge of these conditions is a necessary first step toward implementing workplace changes that can keep you safe and healthy.
Let’s share a brief list of common reproductive hazards up front for you to see.

  • Chemicals and solvents
  • Cigarettes
  • Drugs (legal and illegal)
  • Heat
  • Pesticides
  • Radiation
  • Traumatic risks

An unfortunate consideration in discussing this topic is most potential hazards have not and will not ever be studied to fully understand their effects on humans; it would simply be unethical to conduct such studies. That said, over 1000 chemicals used in the workplace have been shown to have adverse effects on the reproductive health of animals.

workforce

Courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, I’m listing known reproductive problems and workplace hazards demonstrated to cause those problems. Most of you who work in environments featuring any of the aforementioned reproductive hazards are aware of the presence of certain chemicals, pesticides, solvents and others substances being used. Review the hazards. If these are common in your workplace, engage your employee health representative to discuss precautions that are and/or should be in place to minimize your exposure and risk. Make sure you’re fully protected. It is important to note that I’m describing risk here. These effects do not routinely occur in every worker at just any level of exposure. Whether or not an exposure will cause a reproductive problem depends on the amount of time you’re exposed, the amount of the hazard you’re exposed to, how you were exposed and how your body reacts to the hazard. Because every hazard has not been studied for its effects in humans, this list cannot possibly be complete. Always fully engage in workplace safety.
Here are examples of male reproductive hazards and workplace exposures associated with them:

male repro health risks

  • Low hormone levels: insecticides, lead, organophosphate, DDE, manganese, phthalates
  • Low number of sperm: lead, diesel exhaust, pesticide, bisphenol A, organophosphate, chromium, paraquat/malathion
  • Irregular sperm shape: insecticides, lead, carbon disulfide, pesticides, bisphenol A, petrochemical, carbofuran, nickel
  • Irregular sperm genetics: phthalates, styrene, organophosphate, carbaryl, fenvalerate, lead, benzene
  • Chemicals in semen: lead, trichloroethylene, boron, cadmium
  • Low amount of semen: lead, organophosphate, paraquat/malathion
  • Low number of swimming sperm: insecticides, diesel exhaust, lead, carbon disulfide, phthalates, pesticides, bisphenol A, fenvalerate, petrochemical, welding, N, N-dimethylformamide, abamectin, paraquat/malathion
  • Lower sex drive: carbon disulfide, bisphenol A
  • Erectile dysfunction (ED): bisphenol A, bicycle saddles
  • Lower penis sensitivity: bicycle saddles
  • Lower ejaculation quality: bisphenol A

workplace risk assessment

If you are not familiar with the substances just listed but know that you work in an environment with hazardous materials, consider printing out the page and taking it to your job. Ask your safety officer if your workplace exposes you to any of these substances and if so, what protections are in place for workers.
As a final consideration, be aware that many of these substances can be transported out of the work environment back to your home or other locations, exposing others. Be mindful to take the extra step to protect yourself and others by avoiding prolonged and unnecessary exposures to workplace hazards.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
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Straight, No Chaser: Female Reproductive Health and Workplace Hazards

femrep1

Considerations of female reproductive health are important in the work environment. Many different work settings pose risks to women’s reproductive systems. Generally effects can be divided into those impacting a women’s reproductive system itself and those impacting the wellbeing of a pregnancy or baby. An additionally important point is these risks to the female reproductive system often bring consequences to one’s overall health.

simpons-toxic-labels

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s reproductive health?

  • Chemicals such as pesticides, PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), carbon disulfide or organic solvents can disrupt the menstrual cycle and female hormone production. If you suffer from irregular periods, consider whether any work-related exposure could be a contributor.
  • Approximately 10-15% of couples are infertile. Workplace chemical exposures can produce damage to a woman’s eggs (or a man’s sperm), and they can cause changes to female hormones with subsequent drop-offs in the ability to produce a normal menstrual cycle and have normal uterine growth.

How do workplace hazards create or worsen women’s general health as a result of impacting reproductive health?

  • Remember that hormones affect other parts of your body and health other than your reproductive system. Therefore even if you aren’t concerned with becoming pregnant, cause for concern still exists. Imbalances of estrogen and progesterone caused by some workplace exposures can also increase your risk to:
    • Cancers such as endometrial or breast
    • Heart disease
    • Osteoporosis
    • Symptoms of menopause
    • Tissue loss or weakening

femrep5

How do workplace hazards pose risks during pregnancy?

  • It should come as no surprise that certain exposures can cause birth defects or miscarriages. You should be aware of the timing of exposures and subsequent potential effects. Exposure during the first 3 months of pregnancy might cause a birth defect or a miscarriage. Exposure during the last 6 months of pregnancy could slow the baby’s growth, affect its brain development, or cause premature labor.

Breastfeeding-600x330

How do workplace hazards pose risks to babies?
Some chemicals can get into breast milk and others can be transmitted to infants through contact occurring on a parents clothes, skin or hair. Of course, not all chemicals get into breast milk, and not all chemicals that do will harm your baby. Here are a few chemicals that can get into breast milk:

  • Chemicals from smoke, fires, or tobacco
  • Heavy metals (e.g. lead, mercury)
  • Organic solvents and volatile organic chemicals (e.g. bromochloroethane, dioxane, formaldehyde and perchloroethylene)
  • Radioactive chemicals used in hospitals for radiation therapy (e.g as Iodine-131)

Some harmful chemicals have been measured in breast milk at levels that could harm the baby. Lead is one example. Lead in breast milk can harm a baby’s brain. If you work with lead, ask your doctor to measure your blood lead level to see if there is too much lead in your body to safely breastfeed your baby.

For all of these considerations, talk to your employer or your workplace safety officer about ways you can reduce or eliminate your exposure. This might include using personal protective equipment (PPE) or changing your work duties. If you use gloves, protective clothing, a respirator, or other PPE, be sure they are right for you and the chemical to which you are exposed.

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress.

Straight, No Chaser: An Overview of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses

workplace danger

Happy Labor Day. Many of us work in fields in which it is accurate to state “My job makes me sick!” Occupational illnesses and injuries take a massive toll on us. Whether we’re describing exposure to chemicals, workplace injuries, or workplace hazards and diseases, the number of cases of occupational injuries and illnesses has become so prevalent that occurrences are factored into job planning.

workplace_illness3 asbestos

Consider the following dreadful statistics from the US Bureau of Labor Statistics for the year 2012.

  • More than 4,383 U.S. workers died from occupational injuries. That is twelve deaths directly related to work every day in the U.S.
  • It is estimated that 49,000 deaths occur annually from work-related illness – 134 deaths per day.
  • It is estimated that 3.8 million U.S. workers had a nonfatal occupational injury or illness in 2012.
  • Approximately 3 millions emergency room visits occur annually from occupational injuries.
  • Approximately 150,000 hospitalizations occur annually from occupational injuries.

It should go without saying that there is a massive financial toll associated with this loss of life and function. The annual cost in the US for occupational injuries and illnesses is estimated at $192 billion dollars, inclusive of workers’ compensation and other insurance claims, medical expenses and other associated healthcare costs (e.g. physical and occupational therapy, home health, etc.), lost wages and productivity.

workplace illness

Additional Straight, No Chaser posts will focus on some of the more common and concerns aspects of occupational illnesses and injuries, including the following:

In the meantime, enjoy your holiday. I hope it’s a safe one.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress.