Tag Archives: Men’s Health

The Straight, No Chaser Guide to Health Screenings for Men

health_screening

At some particular point  you will start to inventory all the things for which you’re thankful. In the event health or your family comes to mind, you might be interested in preserving your health. This Straight, No Chaser looks at current health screening recommendations. Whether it’s an ounce of prevention or early detection, you’re much better off knowing what your health status is. Today, let’s focus on men’s health, as men are much less likely to have encountered a physician. Please remember: these recommendations are in effect regardless of “how you feel!”
 

Health Screenings For Men – Ages 40 to 64

Blood Pressure Screening:

  • At age 40, you should have your blood pressure checked at least once a year. If you’re seeing a physician at any point during the year, this will be done. Be sure to ask for and document your numbers. If you aren’t seeing a physician, these days local pharmacies and various other opportunities through communities will allow you to stay aware of your blood pressure.
  • If you’re getting it checked on your own, remember the following numbers: if the top number (systolic) is above 120 or the lower number is more than 80, you should schedule an appointment with a health care provider.

Cholesterol Screening

  • Cholesterol levels should be checked no less than every 5 years.

Colon Cancer Screening

  • All men between 50-75 should be screened along one of these guidelines:
    • A stool test for blood every year
    • A flexible sigmoidoscopy test every 5 years with a stool test for blood every 3 years
    • A colonoscopy at least every 10 years, and perhaps more often with risk factors such as ulcerative colitis, a personal or family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal adenomas
  • Men under 50 years may need screening if a strong family history of colon cancer, polyps, inflammatory bowel disease exists.

Diabetes Screening

  • After age 45, all men should be screened every 3 years.
  • If your blood pressure is more than 120/80 mm Hg, or you have other risk factors for diabetes, you may be checked at any age.
  • If you are overweight, you likely will be screened at younger ages; ask if you should be checked whenever you engage the healthcare system.

Dental Exam

  • At these ages, you should be visiting the dentist once or twice a year for an exam, cleaning and screening for oral cancer.

Eye Exam

  • At ages 40-54: an exam every 2-4 years
  • At ages 55-64: an exam every 1-3 years
  • Exams may be needed more frequently if you have visual difficulties or a significant risk for glaucoma. If you have diabetes, you need an annual eye exam.

health-screening1

Heart Disease Prevention

  • At these ages, an examination is needed to quantify your risks for heart disease.
  • When you have a physical examination, specifically ask if you should be taking a daily aspirin.

Immunizations

  • Influenza: you should get a flu shot every year.
  • Shingles (herpes zoster): you may get a shingles vaccine once after age 60.
  • Tetanus-diphtheria: you should get a booster ever 10 years, assuming you’ve received the primary vaccine series – if not, you’ll need that first.

Lung Cancer Screening

  • You will receive annual screening for lung cancer if between ages 55-80 and you have a 30 “pack-year” smoking history and if you either are a current smoker or have quit within the last 15 years.

Osteoporosis Screening

  • Discuss with your healthcare provider if you’re between ages 50-70.

Physical Exam:

  • Yes, this is a very important and basic screening tool. Every year if not more often with every exam, your height, weight, body mass index (BMI) and vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, temperature and respiratory (breathing) rate) should be checked.
  • Your annual exam will also assess your risks due to alcohol, tobacco and other illicit drug use, depression, inadequate diet and exercise, and improper use of seat belts and smoke detectors.

Prostate Cancer Screening:

  • Discuss with your physician at age 45 if you’re African-American or have a family history of prostate cancer in a first-degree relative younger than age 65.
  • Discuss with your physician otherwise if your older than 50.
  • In case you’re wondering, prostate exams are no longer routinely done on men without symptoms. Furthermore, the PSA test is falling out of favor; the potential benefits of PSA screening haven’t been shown to outweigh potential harm done by treatment.

Testicular Exam

  • Testicular self-exams are no longer recommended (source: US Preventive Services Task Force). Your physician may choose to examine you based on risks and/or symptoms.

If this seems like a lot, well, you’re worth it. You can always print this out and compare notes with your physician; odds are they’ll have all of this covered. The most important thing is to get checked!
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.jeffreysterlingbooks.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part Two – Causes

In my last post on erectile dysfunction (ED), I gave a simplistic way to understand and address it.  However, the truth of the matter is the overwhelming majority of cases of ED are not related to stress or other psychological issues.  First, some sense of ‘reasonable’, expected performance should be established, especially as one ages (as discussed here).  Beyond that, you should know that approximately 90% of ED cases involve an underlying medical concern, including, but not limited to, the following:

Diabetes

High blood pressure

Changes/disease to your blood vessels

Low testosterone

Kidney disease

Smoking

Alcohol and Drug abuse

Obesity and High cholesterol

Effects of your medications

erectile-dysfunction

Therefore, today’s message is simple and brief, but I’d suggest it’s probably more important than you have previously thought. You should consult your physician if and when you or your partner’s sexual performance becomes an issue. You may actually discover something that will not only save his performance, but his life.
Finally, in the next post we will review the wide variety of treatment options for ED.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part Two – Causes

In my last post on erectile dysfunction (ED), I gave a simplistic way to understand and address it.  However, the truth of the matter is the overwhelming majority of cases of ED are not related to stress or other psychological issues.  First, some sense of ‘reasonable’, expected performance should be established, especially as one ages (as discussed here).  Beyond that, you should know that approximately 90% of ED cases involve an underlying medical concern, including, but not limited to, the following:

Diabetes

High blood pressure

Changes/disease to your blood vessels

Low testosterone

Kidney disease

Smoking

Alcohol and Drug abuse

Obesity and High cholesterol

Effects of your medications

erectile-dysfunction

Therefore, today’s message is simple and brief, but I’d suggest it’s probably more important than you have previously thought. You should consult your physician if and when you or your partner’s sexual performance becomes an issue. You may actually discover something that will not only save his performance, but his life.
Finally, in the next post we will review the wide variety of treatment options for ED.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part One

It seems appropriate to follow-up a post on age-related changes in your genitourinary system with a discussion on erectile dysfunction (ED).  The nature of the topic is such that I’m going to approach this in two different ways.  Today, I’ll give you a functional, overly simplistic view of ED and tomorrow, I’ll look at it from more of a clinical orientation, because there really are nuances involved. So keep in mind the lead picture. There are many medical and psychological issues that can lead to problems having erections.  I’ll get into that more tomorrow.
In many ways, your health is related to the quality of your blood flow, both in quantity (successful circulation to tissues) and quality (relative absence of toxins we ingest and deliver throughout). This is true for the brain (mental health, absence of strokes), the heart (stamina, absence of heart disease/attacks), and your penis (sexual function, lack of impotence), as well as every other organ.

Excluding truly medical considerations, the two surest ways I know to be a sexual stud (without implants or being of a certain age) are to have a legitimately healthy ego (psychologic health) and more importantly, to be in good physical shape and otherwise healthy. However, for now, given that an erection simply results from strong blood flow to the penis, your overall health better enables that process (the first time as well as if you want multiple contiguous encounters). Everything being equal, the best way for a guy to be able to have sex for whatever you define as a ‘sufficient’ period of time (besides being of a certain young age) is to maintain good cardiovascular health by spending that physician-recommended 20-30″ or more at a time on a treadmill, bike, running, etc.

Drugs like Viagra, Cialis, etc. are really nothing more than drugs that lower blood pressure (and resulting demands by other bodily organs on your blood), such that your penis’ call for an erection is otherwise unimpeded.  Sounds good?  The risk is varying forms of a ‘steal syndrome’, where that blood isn’t being distributed to your heart and brain, which could result in a heart attack or stroke.  That’s why you must “ask your doctor if you’re healthy enough for sex” before using…
Bottom line: practice for good sex and stamina during sex by working out.  It’s just another benefit to being healthy.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part Two – Causes

Causes-of-Erectile-Dysfunction-ED-Treament-Today
In my last post on erectile dysfunction (ED), I gave a simplistic way to understand and address it.  However, the truth of the matter is the overwhelming majority of cases of ED are not related to stress or other psychological issues.  First, some sense of ‘reasonable’, expected performance should be established, especially as one ages (as discussed here).  Beyond that, you should know that approximately 90% of ED cases involve an underlying medical concern, including, but not limited to, the following:

Diabetes

High blood pressure

Changes/disease to your blood vessels

Low testosterone

Kidney disease

Smoking

Alcohol and Drug abuse

Obesity and High cholesterol

Effects of your medications

erectile-dysfunction

Therefore, today’s message is simple and brief, but I’d suggest it’s probably more important than you have previously thought. You should consult your physician if and when you or your partner’s sexual performance becomes an issue. You may actually discover something that will not only save his performance, but his life.
Finally, in the next post we will review the wide variety of treatment options for ED.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part One

erectile-dysfunction
It seems appropriate to follow-up a post on age-related changes in your genitourinary system with a discussion on erectile dysfunction (ED).  The nature of the topic is such that I’m going to approach this in two different ways.  Today, I’ll give you a functional, overly simplistic view of ED and tomorrow, I’ll look at it from more of a clinical orientation, because there really are nuances involved. So keep in mind the lead picture. There are many medical and psychological issues that can lead to problems having erections.  I’ll get into that more tomorrow.
In many ways, your health is related to the quality of your blood flow, both in quantity (successful circulation to tissues) and quality (relative absence of toxins we ingest and deliver throughout). This is true for the brain (mental health, absence of strokes), the heart (stamina, absence of heart disease/attacks), and your penis (sexual function, lack of impotence), as well as every other organ.

Excluding truly medical considerations, the two surest ways I know to be a sexual stud (without implants or being of a certain age) are to have a legitimately healthy ego (psychologic health) and more importantly, to be in good physical shape and otherwise healthy. However, for now, given that an erection simply results from strong blood flow to the penis, your overall health better enables that process (the first time as well as if you want multiple contiguous encounters). Everything being equal, the best way for a guy to be able to have sex for whatever you define as a ‘sufficient’ period of time (besides being of a certain young age) is to maintain good cardiovascular health by spending that physician-recommended 20-30″ or more at a time on a treadmill, bike, running, etc.

Drugs like Viagra, Cialis, etc. are really nothing more than drugs that lower blood pressure (and resulting demands by other bodily organs on your blood), such that your penis’ call for an erection is otherwise unimpeded.  Sounds good?  The risk is varying forms of a ‘steal syndrome’, where that blood isn’t being distributed to your heart and brain, which could result in a heart attack or stroke.  That’s why you must “ask your doctor if you’re healthy enough for sex” before using…
Bottom line: practice for good sex and stamina during sex by working out.  It’s just another benefit to being healthy.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part Two – Causes

Causes-of-Erectile-Dysfunction-ED-Treament-Today
In my last post on erectile dysfunction (ED), I gave a simplistic way to understand and address it.  However, the truth of the matter is the overwhelming majority of cases of ED are not related to stress or other psychological issues.  First, some sense of ‘reasonable’, expected performance should be established, especially as one ages (as discussed here).  Beyond that, you should know that approximately 90% of ED cases involve an underlying medical concern, including, but not limited to, the following:

Diabetes

High blood pressure

Changes/disease to your blood vessels

Low testosterone

Kidney disease

Smoking

Alcohol and Drug abuse

Obesity and High cholesterol

Effects of your medications

Therefore, today’s message is simple and brief, but I’d suggest it’s probably more important than you have previously thought. You should consult your physician if and when you or your partner’s sexual performance becomes an issue. You may actually discover something that will not only save his performance, but his life.
Finally, in the next post we will review the wide variety of treatment options for ED.
Copyright © 2015 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part One

erectile-dysfunction
It seems appropriate to follow-up a post on age-related changes in your genitourinary system with a discussion on erectile dysfunction (ED).  The nature of the topic is such that I’m going to approach this in two different ways.  Today, I’ll give you a functional, overly simplistic view of ED and tomorrow, I’ll look at it from more of a clinical orientation, because there really are nuances involved. So keep in mind the lead picture. There are many medical and psychological issues that can lead to problems having erections.  I’ll get into that more tomorrow.
In many ways, your health is related to the quality of your blood flow, both in quantity (successful circulation to tissues) and quality (relative absence of toxins we ingest and deliver throughout). This is true for the brain (mental health, absence of strokes), the heart (stamina, absence of heart disease/attacks), and your penis (sexual function, lack of impotence), as well as every other organ.

Excluding truly medical considerations, the two surest ways I know to be a sexual stud (without implants or being of a certain age) are to have a legitimately healthy ego (psychologic health) and more importantly, to be in good physical shape and otherwise healthy. However, for now, given that an erection simply results from strong blood flow to the penis, your overall health better enables that process (the first time as well as if you want multiple contiguous encounters). Everything being equal, the best way for a guy to be able to have sex for whatever you define as a ‘sufficient’ period of time (besides being of a certain young age) is to maintain good cardiovascular health by spending that physician-recommended 20-30″ or more at a time on a treadmill, bike, running, etc.

Drugs like Viagra, Cialis, etc. are really nothing more than drugs that lower blood pressure (and resulting demands by other bodily organs on your blood), such that your penis’ call for an erection is otherwise unimpeded.  Sounds good?  The risk is varying forms of a ‘steal syndrome’, where that blood isn’t being distributed to your heart and brain, which could result in a heart attack or stroke.  That’s why you must “ask your doctor if you’re healthy enough for sex” before using…
Bottom line: practice for good sex and stamina during sex by working out.  It’s just another benefit to being healthy.
I welcome any questions or comments you may have.
Copyright © 2015 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Week in Review

week_in_review915
Another information packed week is in the bag.  Thanks for all the comments and suggestions for posts.  I’ll try to get to them as the schedule allows.  In the meantime, be sure to use the information I’m giving you.  I’m not just doing this for fun!  On to the week…
On Sunday, we began the week with a review of MRSA, a variant of the bacteria Staph Aureus, made into a ‘superbug’ by resistance to many traditionally used penicillin-class antibiotics.  We only talked about the skin infections (believe me, it gets much worse), but those are very important as a portal of entry to the rest of your body.  Pay attention to the tips given to stay clear of it.
On Monday, we began a ‘Life Over 40’ series by reviewing changes in the aging skin.  Remember to hydrate, moisturize and limit naked exposure to the damaging effects of the sun.  We also looked at folliculitis, another skin infection caused by Staph and often attributed to shaving and hot tubs.  You’ll think of me the next time a hotel wants you to reuse a towel.
On Tuesday, we looked at changes to your muscles and tendons as you age.  I didn’t mean to scare anyone, but it did appear that I sent some of you to the gym!  Get a personal trainer, and don’t hurt yourself.  We also taught some readers a new word: vaginismus.  This serious, painful and very treatable condition is a cause of much damage and destruction to relationships.  Think Kegels, and get help.
On Wednesday, we looked at changes to your genital system as you age.  The good news is good overall health leads to continued good sexual health as you age.  Even with your hormones seemingly working against you, there’s no reason for you not to stay sexually active as long as you desire.  We also started a series on erectile dysfunction, driving home the same points.  Keep that blood flowing throughout your body, and a lot of good things will happen.
On Thursday, we looked at changes to your heart and lungs as you age.  This really is a great topic with good news for you.  Remember that your heart and lungs will last a lot longer than you typically allow them to if you avoid the toxins that affect you.  We also reviewed the various disease entities that can cause erectile dysfunction.  The common thread is bad health that affects your blood flow will diminish your ability to stay sexually active.
On Friday, we addressed the ways your brain is affected by aging.  Let this serve as a warning to you.  The physical, mental and social effects of brain damage are devastating and epitomizes the stigma of aging.  This is to be forestalled as best you can for as long as you can.  We also gave a look at the treatment options for erectile dysfunction.  Did you know anything about injections, suppositories and pumps?  Did you recognize Smiling Bob?
On Saturday, we gave you a best practices tool many physicians use to determine the need for treatment of strep throat.  Although you may try this at home, as always, if you have concerns, ask your physician what should be done.  The week came full circle with a discussion about inappropriate antibiotic use.  We truly underestimate the body’s ability to cure most illness and too often rush for a solution in a pill.  We’d be better off saving that option for when we really need it, as that gives the highest probability that antibiotics will remain effective.
Thanks as always for your readership and support.  Your feedback and comments are much appreciated.
Copyright © 2013 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part Two – Causes

Causes-of-Erectile-Dysfunction-ED-Treament-Today
In my last post on erectile dysfunction (ED), I gave a simplistic way to understand and address it.  However, the truth of the matter is the overwhelming majority of cases of ED are not related to stress or other psychological issues.  First, some sense of ‘reasonable’, expected performance should be established, especially as one ages (as discussed here).  Beyond that, you should know that approximately 90% of ED cases involve an underlying medical concern, including, but not limited to, the following:

Diabetes

High blood pressure

Changes/disease to your blood vessels

Low testosterone

Kidney disease

Smoking

Alcohol and Drug abuse

Obesity and High cholesterol

Effects of your medications

Therefore, today’s message is simple and brief, but I’d suggest it’s probably more important than you have previously thought. You should consult your physician if and when you or your partner’s sexual performance becomes an issue. You may actually discover something that will not only save his performance, but his life.
Finally, in the next post we will review the wide variety of treatment options for ED.
Copyright © 2013 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Erectile Dysfunction, Part One

erectile-dysfunction
It seems appropriate to follow-up a post on age-related changes in your genitourinary system with a discussion on erectile dysfunction (ED).  The nature of the topic is such that I’m going to approach this in two different ways.  Today, I’ll give you a functional, overly simplistic view of ED and tomorrow, I’ll look at it from more of a clinical orientation, because there really are nuances involved. So keep in mind the lead picture. There are many medical and psychological issues that can lead to problems having erections.  I’ll get into that more tomorrow.
In many ways, your health is related to the quality of your blood flow, both in quantity (successful circulation to tissues) and quality (relative absence of toxins we ingest and deliver throughout). This is true for the brain (mental health, absence of strokes), the heart (stamina, absence of heart disease/attacks), and your penis (sexual function, lack of impotence), as well as every other organ.

Excluding truly medical considerations, the two surest ways I know to be a sexual stud (without implants or being of a certain age) are to have a legitimately healthy ego (psychologic health) and more importantly, to be in good physical shape and otherwise healthy. However, for now, given that an erection simply results from strong blood flow to the penis, your overall health better enables that process (the first time as well as if you want multiple contiguous encounters). Everything being equal, the best way for a guy to be able to have sex for whatever you define as a ‘sufficient’ period of time (besides being of a certain young age) is to maintain good cardiovascular health by spending that physician-recommended 20-30″ or more at a time on a treadmill, bike, running, etc.

Drugs like Viagra, Cialis, etc. are really nothing more than drugs that lower blood pressure (and resulting demands by other bodily organs on your blood), such that your penis’ call for an erection is otherwise unimpeded.  Sounds good?  The risk is varying forms of a ‘steal syndrome’, where that blood isn’t being distributed to your heart and brain, which could result in a heart attack or stroke.  That’s why you must “ask your doctor if you’re healthy enough for sex” before using…
Bottom line: practice for good sex and stamina during sex by working out.  It’s just another benefit to being healthy.
I welcome any questions or comments you may have.
Copyright © 2013 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress