Tag Archives: Infant

Straight, No Chaser: The Emotional Signs of Child Abuse

child-abuse report

In a previous Straight, No Chaser, we provided a pictorial demonstration of the physical signs of child abuse. Unfortunately for many, the emotional signs are even more dangerous. It’s important for you to be able to recognize the subtle emotional cues that could represent a high-risk situation for a child. Too often people take a laissez-faire approach to “abnormally acting” children. Your raising and reporting concerns could save lives.
One very important consideration is that reporting abnormal situations isn’t the same as making accusations. It’s better to think of it as establishing a path for whatever type of help is needed. To that end, today’s post will share information provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help you recognize when a child may be in danger. Pay attention because it could be your child that is affected, and it’s not always true that what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger.

child abuse emotional

The Child
• Shows sudden changes in behavior or school performance
• Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention
• Has learning problems (or difficulty concentrating) that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes
• Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen
• Lacks adult supervision
• Is overly compliant, passive, or withdrawn
• Comes to school or other activities early, stays late and does not want to go home
• Is reluctant to be around a particular person
• Discloses maltreatment

child abuse emotional no excuse

The Parent
• Denies the existence of—or blames the child for—the child’s problems in school or at home
• Asks teachers or other caregivers to use harsh physical discipline if the child misbehaves
• Sees the child as entirely bad, worthless or burdensome
• Demands a level of physical or academic performance the child cannot achieve
• Looks primarily to the child for care, attention, and satisfaction of the parent’s emotional needs
• Shows little concern for the child

child abuse emotional tears

The Parent and Child
• Rarely touch or look at each other
• Consider their relationship entirely negative
• State that they do not like each other
The above list may not be all the signs of abuse or neglect. It is important to pay attention to other behaviors that may seem unusual or concerning. In addition to these signs and symptoms, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides information on the risk factors and perpetrators of child abuse and neglect fatalities:  https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/can/

child_abuse_poster_by_darkblade221-d6e0std

Signs of Physical Abuse
Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the child …
• Has unexplained burns, bites, bruises, broken bones or black eyes
• Has fading bruises or other marks noticeable after an absence from school
• Seems frightened of the parents and protests or cries when it is time to go home
• Shrinks at the approach of adults
• Reports injury by a parent or another adult caregiver
• Abuses animals or pets

Emotional-Child-Abuse

Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the parent or other adult caregiver …
• Offers conflicting, unconvincing or no explanation for the child’s injury, or provides an explanation that is not consistent with the injury
• Describes the child as “evil” or in some other very negative way
• Uses harsh physical discipline with the child
• Has a history of abuse as a child
• Has a history of abusing animals or pets
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Physical Signs of Child Abuse

abuse-emotional-child-96_2

Given how often this topic is in the news, we must continue to drill certain points home. This Straight, No Chaser provides visual examples of the consequences of child abuse. A child’s body doesn’t care if the wounds were meant to injure or just to punish. The long term effects aren’t limited by family traditions of similar behavior. We need an army to protect children against child abuse. A separate post will discuss the mental signs and consequences of abuse, but to start with, I’d like to help you recognize physical signs I tend to look for to potentially identify victims of abuse.
Symptoms include:

  • Black eyes

physical_2[1]

  • Broken bones that are unusual and unexplained
  • Bruise marks or lashes shaped like hands, fingers, or objects (such as a belt)

child abuse whip marks arm

  • Bruises in areas where normal childhood activities would not usually result in bruising

BRUISES-MISSED-ABUSE

  • Bite marks

child abuse bite marks

  • Bulging soft spot (fontanelle) or separations in an infant’s skull

childabusefontanelle

  • Burn marks, usually seen on the hands, arms, or buttocks

childabusebuttock

  • Choke marks around the neck
  • Cigarette burns on exposed areas or on the genitals

child abuse burns

  • Circular marks around the wrists or ankles (signs of twisting or tying up)
  • Unexplained unconsciousness in an infant

If you ever see such things in children, be suspicious, be involved and get help. There are always ‘explanations’ for why things happen to children, but they too frequently seem to defy logic. Of course you can call 911 or the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). You could save a life.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Marijuana Facts and Fiction, Part 2

Marijuana-Facts-and-Statistics

The issues surrounding marijuana use are serious and need full examination, particularly with decriminalization legislature passing and being considered in various parts of the country. It is very important that you are fully aware of the current level of medical understanding regarding marijuana use. Feel free to ask additional questions, and check here for part one of Marijuana Facts and Fiction.

6. Marijuana leads to more serious illicit drug use.
The premise that marijuana is a “gateway drug” is a horrible one, regardless of your political bent. Here are some facts:

  • Currently, people use legal drugs–specifically alcohol and tobacco–more widely than marijuana, and use of these legal drugs leads to illicit drug use more often than marijuana use.
  • Pointing the term “gateway drugs” at marijuana misses the point of how much more dangerous these legal drugs are than marijuana.
  • The majority of marijuana users never use other illicit drugs, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A report by the Institute of Medicine found “no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs.” It is likely more accurate to say that the same factors that drive marijuana use lead to the use of other illicit drugs.
  • On the other hand, it’s irrelevant that the majority of marijuana users never use other illicit drugs. A statistically significant number do. If their basis for complacency about marijuana use is insignificant ill effect, those individuals will suffer the consequences of their subsequent decision to use. From a public health standpoint, it’s not an either/or proposition.

7. So marijuana doesn’t cause lung cancer?
Regarding medical considerations, heavy use can be harmful. Although marijuana use isn’t conclusively associated with lung cancer, heavy pot smokers are still at risk for some of the same health effects as cigarette smokers, like bronchitis. It would be unfair not to point out that these risks are associated with smoking marijuana, and these effects appear to be due to the smoke and not necessarily the cannabis itself.
8. You can overdose on marijuana.
Simply put, there isn’t a documented case of death directly attributable to marijuana overdose.
9. You can’t become dependent on marijuana.
I’ll resist the urge to make a joke about certain of your favorite celebrities. According to the National Institutes of Health, not only is it possible to become dependent on marijuana, but approximately nine percent of marijuana users became clinically dependent. To put this in perspective, 15% of cocaine users and approximately 25% of heroin users become addicted. By the way, there’s a 30% addiction rate for tobacco users.
10. Does marijuana cause withdrawal symptoms?
Yes, it does. Withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, nausea and insomnia. That said, these are minor compared with tobacco, alcohol, heroin and cocaine. The marijuana withdrawal syndrome is not considered life-threatening.
11. Marijuana has not currently been shown to contribute to traffic accidents and fatalities.
It is next to impossible to conduct a research study that would prove this point. What we do know is that studies have shown that smoking marijuana tends to affect spatial perceptions. If under the influence, drivers can lose concentration and experience slower reaction times, leading to swerving or following other cars too closely. Researchers have concluded that driving while high greatly increases the chances of having an accident, and smoking pot and drinking before driving is a particularly dangerous mix. Because of the varying effects of marijuana on individuals, it is hard to set a blood level that indicates intoxication in the same way as with alcohol.
12. Does marijuana causes criminal behavior?
The problem with that question is the word “cause.” It is true that the rate of pot use is higher among criminals, but that doesn’t mean that pot causes the criminal activity, and there is no compelling evidence to suggest that it does. It’s just as conceivable that criminals tend to engage in illicit drug use. Intuitively, the connection between marijuana and subsequent criminal activity isn’t obvious, given the relaxation that marijuana produces (which sharply distinguishes it from alcohol).
13. What’s the difference between smoking marijuana and consuming it in other ways?
When someone smokes marijuana, its active ingredient moves almost immediately into the bloodstream and to the brain. The effects typically last between one and three hours. When eaten, it can take between 30 and 60 minutes to have an effect, but that effect can last up to four hours.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Quick Tips for The Newborn Addition to Your Family

You’re excited. You have a newborn, or maybe you’re a new grandparent caring for the baby for the first time. I get more ‘deer in the headlight’ looks from these folks than perhaps any others. Here’s some Quick Tips for you new parents and family members:

  1. Your child doesn’t have a fully developed immune system yet and won’t until s/he begins receiving immunizations. This is a major reason why breastfeeding is so heavily recommended. Mothers transfer levels of immunity to the baby through this process. It’s not just about bonding.
  2. Your baby is spitting up? Welcome to the club! As long as s/he is gaining weight and is comfortable, there’s not much cause for concern. It’s likely a measure of eating too much and/or too quickly. Acid reflux and or gastroesophageal reflux occurs in about ½ of infants. Again, the baby needs time to have its protective mechanisms fully develop. Speaking of breastfeeding, here’s some more food for thought (no pun intended). Kids who aren’t being breastfed tend to spit up more. Expect it.
  3. I know this is hard and perhaps impractical in many instances, but hold off on multiple family visits for the first month while that immune system is maturing. Exposing them to dozens of relatives is a pretty good way to get a sick baby. Unfortunately, during those first 30 days, babies don’t confine illnesses very well, and even a little cold or ear infection can rapidly spread throughout the body. This could lead to meningitis and someone like me having to perform a lumbar puncture (i.e. spinal tap) on your newborn.
  4. Colic drives parents crazy! Crying newborns obviously are trying to tell you something, and maybe it’s as simple as wanting to be fed, but here’s an important tip for you: check under the diaper. There are multiple issues that present there. Here are three of them:
    1. Anal fissure – hard stools can cause a scratch near the anal opening. Fissures are painful, and whenever stool passes by or anything touches that area, it’s going to hurt! There may be blood associated with this as well; perhaps you’ll notice it on the diaper or streaking along the stool.
    2. Diaper rash – rashes can cause inflammation and infection. They are irritating and painful. New parents must be diligent in getting wet and/or stooled diapers changed with appropriate frequency. After all, wouldn’t you yell if you had to keep that stuff in your undergarments?
    3. Loose hairs – You’d be surprised how often I see loose hairs wrapped around a newborn or infant’s penis, doing it’s best to choke it off. I’m not joking. If the child isn’t circumcised, be sure to retract the foreskin to check and allow you to look over the testes. This could be dangerous.

I mean no disrespect when I say this, but call your primary doctor before bringing your colicky newborn to the ER during those first 30 days of life. The main reason I say this is for your further protection. The ER is where a lot of bad microorganisms live, and although we never mind seeing you, we want to coordinate when it’s appropriate for you to have to expose your baby to the environment.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Emotional Signs of Child Abuse

child-abuse report

In a previous Straight, No Chaser, we provided a pictorial demonstration of the physical signs of child abuse. Unfortunately for many, the emotional signs are even more dangerous. It’s important for you to be able to recognize the subtle emotional cues that could represent a high-risk situation for a child. Too often people take a laissez-faire approach to “abnormally acting” children. Your raising and reporting concerns could save lives.
One very important consideration is that reporting abnormal situations isn’t the same as making accusations. It’s better to think of it as establishing a path for whatever type of help is needed. To that end, today’s post will share information provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help you recognize when a child may be in danger. Pay attention because it could be your child that is affected, and it’s not always true that what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger.

child abuse emotional

The Child
• Shows sudden changes in behavior or school performance
• Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention
• Has learning problems (or difficulty concentrating) that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes
• Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen
• Lacks adult supervision
• Is overly compliant, passive, or withdrawn
• Comes to school or other activities early, stays late and does not want to go home
• Is reluctant to be around a particular person
• Discloses maltreatment

child abuse emotional no excuse

The Parent
• Denies the existence of—or blames the child for—the child’s problems in school or at home
• Asks teachers or other caregivers to use harsh physical discipline if the child misbehaves
• Sees the child as entirely bad, worthless or burdensome
• Demands a level of physical or academic performance the child cannot achieve
• Looks primarily to the child for care, attention, and satisfaction of the parent’s emotional needs
• Shows little concern for the child

child abuse emotional tears

The Parent and Child
• Rarely touch or look at each other
• Consider their relationship entirely negative
• State that they do not like each other
The above list may not be all the signs of abuse or neglect. It is important to pay attention to other behaviors that may seem unusual or concerning. In addition to these signs and symptoms, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides information on the risk factors and perpetrators of child abuse and neglect fatalities:  https://www.childwelfare.gov/topics/can/

child_abuse_poster_by_darkblade221-d6e0std

Signs of Physical Abuse
Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the child …
• Has unexplained burns, bites, bruises, broken bones or black eyes
• Has fading bruises or other marks noticeable after an absence from school
• Seems frightened of the parents and protests or cries when it is time to go home
• Shrinks at the approach of adults
• Reports injury by a parent or another adult caregiver
• Abuses animals or pets

Emotional-Child-Abuse

Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the parent or other adult caregiver …
• Offers conflicting, unconvincing or no explanation for the child’s injury, or provides an explanation that is not consistent with the injury
• Describes the child as “evil” or in some other very negative way
• Uses harsh physical discipline with the child
• Has a history of abuse as a child
• Has a history of abusing animals or pets
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Physical Signs of Child Abuse

abuse-emotional-child-96_2

Given how often this topic is in the news, we must continue to drill certain points home. This Straight, No Chaser provides visual examples of the consequences of child abuse. A child’s body doesn’t care if the wounds were meant to injure or just to punish. The long term effects aren’t limited by family traditions of similar behavior. We need an army to protect children against child abuse. A separate post will discuss the mental signs and consequences of abuse, but to start with, I’d like to help you recognize physical signs I tend to look for to potentially identify victims of abuse.
Symptoms include:

  • Black eyes

physical_2[1]

  • Broken bones that are unusual and unexplained
  • Bruise marks or lashes shaped like hands, fingers, or objects (such as a belt)

child abuse whip marks arm

  • Bruises in areas where normal childhood activities would not usually result in bruising

BRUISES-MISSED-ABUSE

  • Bite marks

child abuse bite marks

  • Bulging soft spot (fontanelle) or separations in an infant’s skull

childabusefontanelle

  • Burn marks, usually seen on the hands, arms, or buttocks

childabusebuttock

  • Choke marks around the neck
  • Cigarette burns on exposed areas or on the genitals

child abuse burns

  • Circular marks around the wrists or ankles (signs of twisting or tying up)
  • Unexplained unconsciousness in an infant

If you ever see such things in children, be suspicious, be involved and get help. There are always ‘explanations’ for why things happen to children, but they too frequently seem to defy logic. Of course you can call 911 or the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). You could save a life.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Marijuana Facts and Fiction, Part 2

Marijuana-Facts-and-Statistics

The issues surrounding marijuana use are serious and need full examination, particularly with decriminalization legislature passing and being considered in various parts of the country. It is very important that you are fully aware of the current level of medical understanding regarding marijuana use. Feel free to ask additional questions, and check here for part one of Marijuana Facts and Fiction.

6. Marijuana leads to more serious illicit drug use.
The premise that marijuana is a “gateway drug” is a horrible one, regardless of your political bent. Here are some facts:

  • Currently, people use legal drugs–specifically alcohol and tobacco–more widely than marijuana, and use of these legal drugs leads to illicit drug use more often than marijuana use.
  • Pointing the term “gateway drugs” at marijuana misses the point of how much more dangerous these legal drugs are than marijuana.
  • The majority of marijuana users never use other illicit drugs, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A report by the Institute of Medicine found “no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs.” It is likely more accurate to say that the same factors that drive marijuana use lead to the use of other illicit drugs.
  • On the other hand, it’s irrelevant that the majority of marijuana users never use other illicit drugs. A statistically significant number do. If their basis for complacency about marijuana use is insignificant ill effect, those individuals will suffer the consequences of their subsequent decision to use. From a public health standpoint, it’s not an either/or proposition.

7. So marijuana doesn’t cause lung cancer?
Regarding medical considerations, heavy use can be harmful. Although marijuana use isn’t conclusively associated with lung cancer, heavy pot smokers are still at risk for some of the same health effects as cigarette smokers, like bronchitis. It would be unfair not to point out that these risks are associated with smoking marijuana, and these effects appear to be due to the smoke and not necessarily the cannabis itself.
8. You can overdose on marijuana.
Simply put, there isn’t a documented case of death directly attributable to marijuana overdose.
9. You can’t become dependent on marijuana.
I’ll resist the urge to make a joke about certain of your favorite celebrities. According to the National Institutes of Health, not only is it possible to become dependent on marijuana, but approximately nine percent of marijuana users became clinically dependent. To put this in perspective, 15% of cocaine users and approximately 25% of heroin users become addicted. By the way, there’s a 30% addiction rate for tobacco users.
10. Does marijuana cause withdrawal symptoms?
Yes, it does. Withdrawal symptoms include anxiety, nausea and insomnia. That said, these are minor compared with tobacco, alcohol, heroin and cocaine. The marijuana withdrawal syndrome is not considered life-threatening.
11. Marijuana has not currently been shown to contribute to traffic accidents and fatalities.
It is next to impossible to conduct a research study that would prove this point. What we do know is that studies have shown that smoking marijuana tends to affect spatial perceptions. If under the influence, drivers can lose concentration and experience slower reaction times, leading to swerving or following other cars too closely. Researchers have concluded that driving while high greatly increases the chances of having an accident, and smoking pot and drinking before driving is a particularly dangerous mix. Because of the varying effects of marijuana on individuals, it is hard to set a blood level that indicates intoxication in the same way as with alcohol.
12. Does marijuana causes criminal behavior?
The problem with that question is the word “cause.” It is true that the rate of pot use is higher among criminals, but that doesn’t mean that pot causes the criminal activity, and there is no compelling evidence to suggest that it does. It’s just as conceivable that criminals tend to engage in illicit drug use. Intuitively, the connection between marijuana and subsequent criminal activity isn’t obvious, given the relaxation that marijuana produces (which sharply distinguishes it from alcohol).
13. What’s the difference between smoking marijuana and consuming it in other ways?
When someone smokes marijuana, its active ingredient moves almost immediately into the bloodstream and to the brain. The effects typically last between one and three hours. When eaten, it can take between 30 and 60 minutes to have an effect, but that effect can last up to four hours.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Quick Tips for The Newborn Addition to Your Family

Cute-Newborn-Black-Baby-Girl-Picture
You’re excited. You have a newborn, or maybe you’re a new grandparent caring for the baby for the first time. I get more ‘deer in the headlight’ looks from these folks than perhaps any others. Here’s some Quick Tips for you new parents and family members:

  1. Your child doesn’t have a fully developed immune system yet and won’t until s/he begins receiving immunizations. This is a major reason why breastfeeding is so heavily recommended. Mothers transfer levels of immunity to the baby through this process. It’s not just about bonding.
  2. Your baby is spitting up? Welcome to the club! As long as s/he is gaining weight and is comfortable, there’s not much cause for concern. It’s likely a measure of eating too much and/or too quickly. Acid reflux and or gastroesophageal reflux occurs in about ½ of infants. Again, the baby needs time to have its protective mechanisms fully develop. Speaking of breastfeeding, here’s some more food for thought (no pun intended). Kids who aren’t being breastfed tend to spit up more. Expect it.
  3. I know this is hard and perhaps impractical in many instances, but hold off on multiple family visits for the first month while that immune system is maturing. Exposing them to dozens of relatives is a pretty good way to get a sick baby. Unfortunately, during those first 30 days, babies don’t confine illnesses very well, and even a little cold or ear infection can rapidly spread throughout the body. This could lead to meningitis and someone like me having to perform a lumbar puncture (i.e. spinal tap) on your newborn.
  4. Colic drives parents crazy! Crying newborns obviously are trying to tell you something, and maybe it’s as simple as wanting to be fed, but here’s an important tip for you: check under the diaper. There are multiple issues that present there. Here are three of them:
    1. Anal fissure – hard stools can cause a scratch near the anal opening. Fissures are painful, and whenever stool passes by or anything touches that area, it’s going to hurt! There may be blood associated with this as well; perhaps you’ll notice it on the diaper or streaking along the stool.
    2. Diaper rash – rashes can cause inflammation and infection. They are irritating and painful. New parents must be diligent in getting wet and/or stooled diapers changed with appropriate frequency. After all, wouldn’t you yell if you had to keep that stuff in your undergarments?
    3. Loose hairs – You’d be surprised how often I see loose hairs wrapped around a newborn or infant’s penis, doing it’s best to choke it off. I’m not joking. If the child isn’t circumcised, be sure to retract the foreskin to check and allow look over the testes. This could be dangerous.

I mean no disrespect when I say this, but call your primary doctor before bringing your colicky newborn to the ER during those first 30 days of life. The main reason I say this is for your further protection. The ER is where a lot of bad microorganisms live, and although we never mind seeing you, we want to coordinate when it’s appropriate for you to have to expose your baby to the environment.
Feel free to ask any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Emotional Signs of Child Abuse

child-abuse report

In a previous Straight, No Chaser, we provided a pictorial demonstration of the physical signs of child abuse. Unfortunately for many, the emotional signs are even more dangerous. It’s important for you to be able to recognize the subtle emotional cues that could represent a high-risk situation for a child. Too often people take a laissez-faire approach to “abnormally acting” children. Your raising and reporting concerns could save lives.
One very important consideration is that reporting abnormal situations isn’t the same as making accusations. It’s better to think of it as establishing a path for whatever type of help is needed. To that end, today’s post will share information provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help you recognize when a child may be in danger. Pay attention because it could be your child that is affected, and it’s not always true that what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger.

child abuse emotional

The Child
• Shows sudden changes in behavior or school performance
• Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention
• Has learning problems (or difficulty concentrating) that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes
• Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen
• Lacks adult supervision
• Is overly compliant, passive, or withdrawn
• Comes to school or other activities early, stays late and does not want to go home
• Is reluctant to be around a particular person
• Discloses maltreatment

child abuse emotional no excuse

The Parent
• Denies the existence of—or blames the child for—the child’s problems in school or at home
• Asks teachers or other caregivers to use harsh physical discipline if the child misbehaves
• Sees the child as entirely bad, worthless or burdensome
• Demands a level of physical or academic performance the child cannot achieve
• Looks primarily to the child for care, attention, and satisfaction of the parent’s emotional needs
• Shows little concern for the child

child abuse emotional tears

The Parent and Child
• Rarely touch or look at each other
• Consider their relationship entirely negative
• State that they do not like each other
The above list may not be all the signs of abuse or neglect. It is important to pay attention to other behaviors that may seem unusual or concerning. In addition to these signs and symptoms, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides information on the risk factors and perpetrators of child abuse and neglect fatalities: https://www. childwelfare.gov/can/risk_perpetrators.cfm

child_abuse_poster_by_darkblade221-d6e0std

Signs of Physical Abuse
Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the child …
• Has unexplained burns, bites, bruises, broken bones or black eyes
• Has fading bruises or other marks noticeable after an absence from school
• Seems frightened of the parents and protests or cries when it is time to go home
• Shrinks at the approach of adults
• Reports injury by a parent or another adult caregiver
• Abuses animals or pets

Emotional-Child-Abuse

Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the parent or other adult caregiver …
• Offers conflicting, unconvincing or no explanation for the child’s injury, or provides an explanation that is not consistent with the injury
• Describes the child as “evil” or in some other very negative way
• Uses harsh physical discipline with the child
• Has a history of abuse as a child
• Has a history of abusing animals or pets
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Physical Signs of Child Abuse

abuse-emotional-child-96_2

Given how often this topic is in the news, we must continue to drill certain points home. This Straight, No Chaser provides visual examples of the consequences of child abuse. A child’s body doesn’t care if the wounds were meant to injure or just to punish. The long term effects aren’t limited by family traditions of similar behavior. We need an army to protect children against child abuse. A separate post will discuss the mental signs and consequences of abuse, but to start with, I’d like to help you recognize physical signs I tend to look for to potentially identify victims of abuse.
Symptoms include:

  • Black eyes

physical_2[1]

  • Broken bones that are unusual and unexplained
  • Bruise marks or lashes shaped like hands, fingers, or objects (such as a belt)

child abuse whip marks arm

  • Bruises in areas where normal childhood activities would not usually result in bruising

BRUISES-MISSED-ABUSE

  • Bite marks

child abuse bite marks

  • Bulging soft spot (fontanelle) or separations in an infant’s skull

childabusefontanelle

  • Burn marks, usually seen on the hands, arms, or buttocks

childabusebuttock

  • Choke marks around the neck
  • Cigarette burns on exposed areas or on the genitals

child abuse burns

  • Circular marks around the wrists or ankles (signs of twisting or tying up)
  • Unexplained unconsciousness in an infant

If you ever see such things in children, be suspicious, be involved and get help. There are always ‘explanations’ for why things happen to children, but they too frequently seem to defy logic. Of course you can call 911 or the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). You could save a life.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Emotional Signs of Child Abuse

child-abuse report

In a previous Straight, No Chaser, we provided a pictorial demonstration of the physical signs of child abuse. Unfortunately for many, the emotional signs are even more dangerous. It’s important for you to be able to recognize the subtle emotional cues that could represent a high-risk situation for a child. Too often people take a laissez-faire approach to “abnormally acting” children. Your raising and reporting concerns could save lives.
One very important consideration is that reporting abnormal situations isn’t the same as making accusations. It’s better to think of it as establishing a path for whatever type of help is needed. To that end, today’s post will share information provided by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to help you recognize when a child may be in danger. Pay attention because it could be your child that is affected, and it’s not always true that what doesn’t kill you will make you stronger.

child abuse emotional

The Child
• Shows sudden changes in behavior or school performance
• Has not received help for physical or medical problems brought to the parents’ attention
• Has learning problems (or difficulty concentrating) that cannot be attributed to specific physical or psychological causes
• Is always watchful, as though preparing for something bad to happen
• Lacks adult supervision
• Is overly compliant, passive, or withdrawn
• Comes to school or other activities early, stays late and does not want to go home
• Is reluctant to be around a particular person
• Discloses maltreatment

child abuse emotional no excuse

The Parent
• Denies the existence of—or blames the child for—the child’s problems in school or at home
• Asks teachers or other caregivers to use harsh physical discipline if the child misbehaves
• Sees the child as entirely bad, worthless or burdensome
• Demands a level of physical or academic performance the child cannot achieve
• Looks primarily to the child for care, attention, and satisfaction of the parent’s emotional needs
• Shows little concern for the child

child abuse emotional tears

The Parent and Child
• Rarely touch or look at each other
• Consider their relationship entirely negative
• State that they do not like each other
The above list may not be all the signs of abuse or neglect. It is important to pay attention to other behaviors that may seem unusual or concerning. In addition to these signs and symptoms, Child Welfare Information Gateway provides information on the risk factors and perpetrators of child abuse and neglect fatalities: https://www. childwelfare.gov/can/risk_perpetrators.cfm

child_abuse_poster_by_darkblade221-d6e0std

Signs of Physical Abuse
Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the child …
• Has unexplained burns, bites, bruises, broken bones or black eyes
• Has fading bruises or other marks noticeable after an absence from school
• Seems frightened of the parents and protests or cries when it is time to go home
• Shrinks at the approach of adults
• Reports injury by a parent or another adult caregiver
• Abuses animals or pets

Emotional-Child-Abuse

Consider the possibility of physical abuse when the parent or other adult caregiver …
• Offers conflicting, unconvincing or no explanation for the child’s injury, or provides an explanation that is not consistent with the injury
• Describes the child as “evil” or in some other very negative way
• Uses harsh physical discipline with the child
• Has a history of abuse as a child
• Has a history of abusing animals or pets
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA). Enjoy some of our favorite posts and frequently asked questions as well as a daily note explaining the benefits of SMA membership. Please share our page with your Friends on WordPress, on Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Physical Signs of Child Abuse

abuse-emotional-child-96_2

Given how often this topic is in the news, we must continue to drill certain points home. This Straight, No Chaser provides visual examples of the consequences of child abuse. A child’s body doesn’t care if the wounds were meant to injure or just to punish. The long term effects aren’t limited by family traditions of similar behavior. We need an army to protect children against child abuse. A separate post will discuss the mental signs and consequences of abuse, but to start with, I’d like to help you recognize physical signs I tend to look for to potentially identify victims of abuse.
Symptoms include:

  • Black eyes

physical_2[1]

  • Broken bones that are unusual and unexplained
  • Bruise marks or lashes shaped like hands, fingers, or objects (such as a belt)

child abuse whip marks arm

  • Bruises in areas where normal childhood activities would not usually result in bruising

BRUISES-MISSED-ABUSE

  • Bite marks

child abuse bite marks

  • Bulging soft spot (fontanelle) or separations in an infant’s skull

childabusefontanelle

  • Burn marks, usually seen on the hands, arms, or buttocks

childabusebuttock

  • Choke marks around the neck
  • Cigarette burns on exposed areas or on the genitals

child abuse burns

  • Circular marks around the wrists or ankles (signs of twisting or tying up)
  • Unexplained unconsciousness in an infant

If you ever see such things in children, be suspicious, be involved and get help. There are always ‘explanations’ for why things happen to children, but they too frequently seem to defy logic. Of course you can call 911 or the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). You could save a life.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offer. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress.

Straight, No Chaser: Quick Tips for The Newborn Addition to Your Family

Cute-Newborn-Black-Baby-Girl-Picture
You’re excited. You have a newborn, or maybe you’re a new grandparent caring for the baby for the first time. I get more ‘deer in the headlight’ looks from these folks than perhaps any others. Here’s some Quick Tips for you new parents and family members:

  1. Your child doesn’t have a fully developed immune system yet and won’t until s/he begins receiving immunizations. This is a major reason why breastfeeding is so heavily recommended. Mothers transfer levels of immunity to the baby through this process. It’s not just about bonding.
  2. Your baby is spitting up? Welcome to the club! As long as s/he is gaining weight and is comfortable, there’s not much cause for concern. It’s likely a measure of eating too much and/or too quickly. Acid reflux and or gastroesophageal reflux occurs in about ½ of infants. Again, the baby needs time to have its protective mechanisms fully develop. Speaking of breastfeeding, here’s some more food for thought (no pun intended). Kids who aren’t being breastfed tend to spit up more. Expect it.
  3. I know this is hard and perhaps impractical in many instances, but hold off on multiple family visits for the first month while that immune system is maturing. Exposing them to dozens of relatives is a pretty good way to get a sick baby. Unfortunately, during those first 30 days, babies don’t confine illnesses very well, and even a little cold or ear infection can rapidly spread throughout the body. This could lead to meningitis and someone like me having to perform a lumbar puncture (i.e. spinal tap) on your newborn.
  4. Colic drives parents crazy! Crying newborns obviously are trying to tell you something, and maybe it’s as simple as wanting to be fed, but here’s an important tip for you: check under the diaper. There are multiple issues that present there. Here are three of them:
    1. Anal fissure – hard stools can cause a scratch near the anal opening. Fissures are painful, and whenever stool passes by or anything touches that area, it’s going to hurt! There may be blood associated with this as well; perhaps you’ll notice it on the diaper or streaking along the stool.
    2. Diaper rash – rashes can cause inflammation and infection. They are irritating and painful. New parents must be diligent in getting wet and/or stooled diapers changed with appropriate frequency. After all, wouldn’t you yell if you had to keep that stuff in your undergarments?
    3. Loose hairs – You’d be surprised how often I see loose hairs wrapped around a newborn or infant’s penis, doing it’s best to choke it off. I’m not joking. If the child isn’t circumcised, be sure to retract the foreskin to check and allow look over the testes. This could be dangerous.

I mean no disrespect when I say this, but call your primary doctor before bringing your colicky newborn to the ER during those first 30 days of life. The main reason I say this is for your further protection. The ER is where a lot of bad microorganisms live, and although we never mind seeing you, we want to coordinate when it’s appropriate for you to have to expose your baby to the environment.

Straight, No Chaser: Learn The Physical Signs of Child Abuse

abuse-emotional-child-96_2
We need an army to protect children against child abuse. I will intermittently be discussing various forms of abuse, but to start with, I’d like to help you recognize physical signs I tend to look for to potentially identify victims of abuse.
Symptoms include:

  • Black eyes

physical_2[1]

  • Broken bones that are unusual and unexplained
  • Bruise marks or lashes shaped like hands, fingers, or objects (such as a belt)

child abuse whip marks arm

 

  • Bruises in areas where normal childhood activities would not usually result in bruising

BRUISES-MISSED-ABUSE

  • Bite marks

child abuse bite marks

  • Bulging soft spot (fontanelle) or separations in an infant’s skull

childabusefontanelle

 

  • Burn marks, usually seen on the hands, arms, or buttocks

childabusebuttock

  • Choke marks around the neck
  • Cigarette burns on exposed areas or on the genitals

child abuse burns

  • Circular marks around the wrists or ankles (signs of twisting or tying up)
  • Unexplained unconsciousness in an infant

If you ever see such things in children, be suspicious, be involved and get help. There are always ‘explanations’ for why things happen to children, but they too frequently seem to defy logic. Of course you can call 911 or the Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline (1-800-4-A-CHILD). You could save a life.