Tag Archives: Heimlich

Straight, No Chaser: Quick Tips to Save a Drowning Victim

Drowning-Prevention-Circle Infographic

Can you swim? Have you ever witnessed someone drowning or almost drown? I’ve actually been rescued. It’s a truly horrifying experience. It only takes a few minutes of your time to learn how to perform in this life-threatening environment. This Straight, No Chaser discusses simple but critical steps you can take to save a life – even if you can’t swim. Remember, prevention and preparation give the best opportunity for survival in many circumstances.
1. If the victim is still conscious, attempt to hand him something that can be used to pull him from the water. If you’re out of handing distance, throw either a floatable object or something he can hold onto and with which he can be pulled to safety.
2. If the victim has fallen into solid ice, and you have enough individuals, consider forming a human rope, with each individual interconnected and at least two individuals safely connected back on firm land.
Drowning-Survival-Infographic3. The victim should be removed from the water at the earliest opportunity. Forego inclination to perform chest compressions or rescue breathing in the water.
4. If possible, remove the victim from the water as flat (horizontal) as possible. You want to make every effort to avoid damage to the neck throughout this entire process (this actually would be additional injury to the neck; there’s a fair chance such an injury has already occurred).
CPR cab
5. Once victims are out of the water, NEVER assume death unless you’re a qualified medical professional. Begin CPR, as described in this Straight, No Chaser.
6. If the victim has an altered mental status, check the airway for foreign material and vomitus. Use your fingers to sweep away any material visible between the mouth and throat.
7. The Heimlich maneuver (abdominal thrusting) is not effective in removing swallowed water. Don’t waste valuable time with it.
8. If you’ve successfully saved a drowning victim, don’t bother taking off wet clothes. It’s not worth the possible agitation to the neck, and recent medical thought suggests that cooling after certain likely types of cardiac arrest is especially beneficial in reducing brain injury and death. This consideration is much more important than any benefit to be gained from warming the patient. Sounds weird, but it’s the truth.
Drowning_safety_children_CPSC

Regarding the above picture, yes it’s true that one can drown in inches of water. Infant safety means keeping them at arm’s length while they’re in the water.

Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: What Will You Do If You See Someone Choking?

choking1

So … what would you do if someone around you starting choking. Or if they choked, then lost consciousness? What would you do if you choked and no one else was around? Don’t you think you should know? Read on …
First things first. You’ve all heard of the Heimlich maneuver, even if you don’t know how to do it. My job today is to make this easy for you. My first task will be to pass on the physician’s mantra of “Do No Harm.” To that end, let’s start with things you shouldn’t do.

  • If the person is able to speak, don’t interfere.
  • If the person is coughing and still has a normal level of awareness, don’t interfere.
  • If the person is able to breathe in and out without excessive difficulty, don’t interfere.
  • If the person is conscious, don’t place anything in his/her mouth trying to extract an object.

Next, let’s review a few quick points to help you understand what could be going on.

  • Choking is occurring because something is blocking the airway (aka windpipe).
  • Choking is dangerous because complete blockage will prevent oxygen from circulating thorough the body.
  • Choking is deadly because without oxygen, permanent brain damage will likely occur in four to six minutes.

Partial blockage isn’t the same as complete blockage. The body has protective reflexes to deal with blockage. That’s what coughing is. Once blockage has become complete, you’re facing a life-threatening emergency, and the risks of doing something outweigh the risks of doing nothing.

choking

It’s not that difficult to know if someone’s choking; they’re likely grabbing their throat. You would do well to know what it looks like if someone has already choked or is choking but can’t use his/her hands. Here are some clues:

  • Coughing may be increasingly weaker.
  • They likely will exhibit difficulty breathing.
  • They may be unable to speak.
  • Their skin may have a bluish or purplish color.
  • You may hear high-pitched musical sounds while they’re breathing.
  • They may have blacked out (from the blockage).

heimlich

Here are universally accepted steps to the Heimlich maneuver (in someone not obese or pregnant):

  • Ask the person, “Are you choking?”
  • Then ask them to speak. If they can speak or are vigorously coughing, you watch and wait. If not, proceed.
  • Standing behind the person, wrap your arms around his/her waist.
  • Placing your thumb just above the belly button (navel), make a fist with one hand.
  • Grasp the fist with your other hand.
  • Thrust your fist quickly, upward and inward.
  • Repeat until the person either loses consciousness or the object is dislodged.

If the person is obese or pregnant, wrap your arms around the chest, not the abdomen. Place your fist between the nipples on the middle of the breastbone, and make firm thrusts back toward you.
If the person loses consciousness, there are four steps you must take.

  1. If you see something blocking the airway, try to remove it.
  2. Lower the person to the floor, preferably on his/her side until you start CPR or if vomiting starts.
  3. Have someone call 911.
  4. Begin CPR.

Of course, prevention is key. Take care to chew your food slowly and thoroughly.
Here are three more tips for those most at risk:

  • Children: Keep them away from small objects that can be placed in their mouths.
  • Elderly: Make sure their dentures fit appropriately.
  • Adults: Limit alcohol intake around the time of eating.

In an upcoming Straight, No Chaser, we’ll also add a post for you regarding how to handle yourself and infants (less than one year old) if choking.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Quick Tips to Save a Drowning Victim

Drowning-Prevention-Circle Infographic

Can you swim? Have you ever witnessed someone drowning or almost drown? I’ve actually been rescued. It’s a truly horrifying experience. It only takes a few minutes of your time to learn how to perform in this life-threatening environment. This Straight, No Chaser discusses simple but critical you can take to save a life – even if you can’t swim. Remember, prevention and preparation give the best opportunity for survival in many circumstances.
1. If the victim is still conscious, attempt to hand him something that can be used to pull him from the water. If you’re out of handing distance, throw either a floatable object or something he can hold onto and with which he can be pulled to safety.
2. If the victim has fallen into solid ice, and you have enough individuals, consider forming a human rope, with each individual interconnected and at least two individuals safely connected back on firm land.
Drowning-Survival-Infographic3. The victim should be removed from the water at the earliest opportunity. Forego inclination to perform chest compressions or rescue breathing in the water.
4. If possible, remove the victim from the water as flat (horizontal) as possible. You want to make every effort to avoid damage to the neck throughout this entire process (this actually would be additional injury to the neck; there’s a fair chance such an injury has already occurred).
CPR cab
5. Once victims are out of the water, NEVER assume death unless you’re a qualified medical professional. Begin CPR, as described in this Straight, No Chaser.
6. If the victim has an altered mental status, check the airway for foreign material and vomitus. Use your fingers to sweep away any material visible between the mouth and throat.
7. The Heimlich maneuver (abdominal thrusting) is not effective in removing swallowed water. Don’t waste valuable time with it.
8. If you’ve successfully saved a drowning victim, don’t bother taking off wet clothes. It’s not worth the possible agitation to the neck, and recent medical thought suggests that cooling after certain likely types of cardiac arrest is especially beneficial in reducing brain injury and death. This consideration is much more important than any benefit to be gained from warming the patient. Sounds weird, but it’s the truth.
Drowning_safety_children_CPSC

Regarding the above picture, yes it’s true that one can drown in inches of water. Infant safety means keeping them at arm’s length while they’re in the water.

Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd. Preorder your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com.

Copyright © 2015 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress.