Tag Archives: Cervical cancer

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Cancer – The Sexually Transmitted Cancer

cervical-cancer-awareness

Let’s put this take home message up front: here’s a pretty good demonstration of the value of vaccines. I hope that each of you resolves to get any children you care for vaccinated before they become sexually active.
I want to thank my friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Ellis, noted Ob/Gyn physician for contributing to this post. Let’s start this with two simple statements:

  • Cervical cancer has basically been shown to be caused by an infection.
  • There soon will be no reason that anyone has to have cervical cancer.

female reproductive system

As a reminder, the cervix is the lower and narrow end of the uterus that connects the vagina to the upper part of the uterus (i.e. the womb). Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the US.
In 2018, it is estimated that:

  • 13,240 women in the United States will be diagnosed with cervical cancer.
  • 4,170 women in the United States will die from cervical cancer.

Fortunately, over the last 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly, largely due to Pap tests. The even better news is the opportunity exists to virtually eradicate the disease. Cervical cancer is highly preventable because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

HPV oral

Yes, cervical cancer is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), and the most common STI is now known to be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of you will recognize HPV as a cause of genital warts. This means if you ever develop warts, go get checked immediately (another good reason to do this is because genital syphilis may also present as warts). Even more importantly, certain HPV strains have been shown to cause virtually all cervical and anal cancers. HPV also causes some cancers of the vagina, penis, and oropharynx (a certain part of the throat—and yes, this is what Michael Douglas was referencing about having obtained throat cancer by performing oral sex).
Early on, cervical cancer may not cause signs and symptoms, but advanced cervical cancer may cause bleeding or discharge from the vagina, either of which may be persistent or abnormal from similar episodes you’ve had in the past. If you have any of these signs, see your physician for an evaluation of this and other possible causes of these symptoms.
Am I at risk for HPV? How do you get this?

HPV STD

Everyone having sex or who has ever had sex is at risk for HPV. In fact, nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex, but also through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact without intercourse. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners even if and when the infected person has no signs or symptoms. It’s important to know there’s a big difference between obtaining the HPV virus and obtaining cancer from having the HPV virus.
If I get genital warts, will I get cancer?

HPV genital warts

Not necessarily, but the possibility is high enough that you need to get treated. Most HPV infections actually resolve on their own. It’s the ones that linger that pose particular concern.
If I do have warts, what increases my risks for these cancers?

hpv risks

Smoking, a weakened immune system, having had many children (for increased risk of cervical cancer), long-term oral contraceptive use (for increased risk of cervical cancer), and poor oral hygiene (for increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer) all increase the risk for developing cancer after a HPV infection.
How do I get this and how do I prevent it?

HPV

The most reliable way to prevent infection with HPV is abstinence, avoiding any skin-to-skin oral, anal, or genital contact with another. If you are sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent HPV infection. However, because of the lack of symptoms, it’s hard to know whether a partner is currently infected with HPV. Use of condoms reduces the transmission of HPV between partners, although areas not covered by a condom can still be infected.

HPV vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two HPV vaccines, branded as Gardasil (for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in these areas) and Cervarix (for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV). Both vaccines are highly effective, but neither has been approved for prevention of penile or oropharyngeal cancer. And yes, it’s safe and effective as young as age 9, although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends vaccination between ages 11–14. You must contact your physician for additional details on these important medications.
How do I treat HPV infections?
There’s no treatment for HPV itself, but the problems HPV causes can be treated. We’ll address the two major ones:

  • Genital warts may be treated topically by you or a healthcare provider. If not treated, they may multiply, go away, or stay the same.
  • Cervical cancer may be treated by your gynecologist, but be warned: Prevention is best, and early detection gives you the best chance for the best outcomes. Continue those annual exams.

There will soon come a time when all boys and girls are receiving vaccinations at around ages 11–12, and cervical cancer (in particular) will become a rare entity. That only happens if you get your family immunized. The science is in. There’s no good reasons left to wait.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Health Awareness

cervical_health_awareness_month

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and to that end, The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) boldly proclaims “No woman should die of cervical cancer.”
It’s cervical health month in the United States, and this point has a rather simple message: Cervical cancer is highly preventable and can be cured when discovered and treatment early. Here are some quick tips to help you check this off of your list of concerns.

  • Every child should get vaccinated at age 11 or 12. Even if you’ve reached age 26 and haven’t been vaccinated, you should discuss options with your physician.
  • The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to get screened regularly starting at age 21.

pap smear

  • The Pap test (or smear) should be performed regularly at age 21. It looks for precancerous changes to the cervix that identify the need for early treatment. In many cases a normal test will eliminate the need for another test for the next three years, but your physician will discuss your individual circumstances in this regard.
  • The HPV test looks for the virus that is now known to be the cause of cervical cancer. Furthermore, human papillomavirus (HPV) is sexually transmitted. The HPV test can be done at the same time as the Pap test from the same examination.

Hopefully knowing these simple tools will convince you to be attentive to preventing and managing your cervical health. This is a public health success story in that cervical cancer could be eliminated if everyone followed the above steps. The rest is up to you.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Cancer – The Sexually Transmitted Cancer

cervical-cancer-awareness

Let’s put this take home message up front: here’s a pretty good demonstration of the value of vaccines. I hope that each of you resolves to get any children you care for vaccinated before they become sexually active.
I want to thank my friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Ellis, noted Ob/Gyn physician for contributing to this post. Let’s start this with two simple statements:

  • Cervical cancer has basically been shown to be caused by an infection.
  • There soon will be no reason that anyone has to have cervical cancer.

female reproductive system

As a reminder, the cervix is the lower and narrow end of the uterus that connects the vagina to the upper part of the uterus (i.e. the womb). Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the US.
In 2011 (the most recent year numbers are available):

  • 12,109 women in the United States were diagnosed with cervical cancer.
  • 4,092 women in the United States died from cervical cancer.

Fortunately, over the last 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly, largely due to Pap tests. The even better news is the opportunity exists to virtually eradicate the disease. Cervical cancer is highly preventable because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

HPV oral

Yes, cervical cancer is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), and the most common STI is now known to be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of you will recognize HPV as a cause of genital warts. This means if you ever develop warts, go get checked immediately (another good reason to do this is because genital syphilis may also present as warts). Even more importantly, certain HPV strains have been shown to cause virtually all cervical and anal cancers. HPV also causes some cancers of the vagina, penis, and oropharynx (a certain part of the throat—and yes, this is what Michael Douglas was referencing about having obtained throat cancer by performing oral sex).
Early on, cervical cancer may not cause signs and symptoms, but advanced cervical cancer may cause bleeding or discharge from the vagina, either of which may be persistent or abnormal from similar episodes you’ve had in the past. If you have any of these signs, see your physician for an evaluation of this and other possible causes of these symptoms.
Am I at risk for HPV? How do you get this?

HPV STD

Everyone having sex or who has ever had sex is at risk for HPV. In fact, nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex, but also through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact without intercourse. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners even if and when the infected person has no signs or symptoms. It’s important to know there’s a big difference between obtaining the HPV virus and obtaining cancer from having the HPV virus.
If I get genital warts, will I get cancer?

HPV genital warts

Not necessarily, but the possibility is high enough that you need to get treated. Most HPV infections actually resolve on their own. It’s the ones that linger that pose particular concern.
If I do have warts, what increases my risks for these cancers?

hpv risks

Smoking, a weakened immune system, having had many children (for increased risk of cervical cancer), long-term oral contraceptive use (for increased risk of cervical cancer), and poor oral hygiene (for increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer) all increase the risk for developing cancer after a HPV infection.
How do I get this and how do I prevent it?

HPV

The most reliable way to prevent infection with HPV is abstinence, avoiding any skin-to-skin oral, anal, or genital contact with another. If you are sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent HPV infection. However, because of the lack of symptoms, it’s hard to know whether a partner is currently infected with HPV. Use of condoms reduces the transmission of HPV between partners, although areas not covered by a condom can still be infected.

HPV vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two HPV vaccines, branded as Gardasil (for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in these areas) and Cervarix (for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV). Both vaccines are highly effective, but neither has been approved for prevention of penile or oropharyngeal cancer. And yes, it’s safe and effective as young as age 9, although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends vaccination between ages 11–14. You must contact your physician for additional details on these important medications.
How do I treat HPV infections?
There’s no treatment for HPV itself, but the problems HPV causes can be treated. We’ll address the two major ones:

  • Genital warts may be treated topically by you or a healthcare provider. If not treated, they may multiply, go away, or stay the same.
  • Cervical cancer may be treated by your gynecologist, but be warned: Prevention is best, and early detection gives you the best chance for the best outcomes. Continue those annual exams.

There will soon come a time when all boys and girls are receiving vaccinations at around ages 11–12, and cervical cancer (in particular) will become a rare entity. That only happens if you get your family immunized. The science is in. There’s no good reasons left to wait.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser In The News: Success Eliminating Cervical Cancer with the HPV Vaccine

hpv-img-2-lg

In the news is information about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, used to prevent sexually transmitted infections causing genital warts, and more importantly, causing cervical, anal, penile, mouth and throat cancers. Of particular interest is information demonstrating the vaccine developed to prevent HPV infections is even more effective that thought.
Federal researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) note that existing use of the vaccine has reduced the presence of the virus in teenage girls by approximately two-thirds. This information is especially impressive given the relative novelty and limited use of the vaccine. Only about 40% of girls and 20% of boys between ages 13-17 have been vaccinated. The better news for the future is public health professionals are making a significant push for greater vaccine use at ages 11-12, when the vaccination rates for other childhood diseases exceed 80%.

hpv_vaccine_cancer_prevention

Here’s a public health message: taking the vaccine is about cancer prevention, not just preventing a sexually transmitted infection (genital warts). Unfortunately this message hasn’t fully penetrated the national dialogue: only the District of Columbia, Rhode Island and Virginia require the HPV vaccine, even though it is believed universal use of the vaccine would virtually eradicate cervical cancer. As a frame of reference, several other countries (e.g. Australia) in which HPV vaccine use is mandatory, has achieved over 90% vaccination rates over 90% reduction in rates of genital warts.
About 14 million Americans become infected with HPV each year, and approximately 27,000 people get cancer as a result of an infection from HPV. The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,120 women will die of cervical cancer this year.
If you have a child of either sex, have the conversation with your pediatrician or primary care physician about the HPV vaccine as early as age 10. If you’re a female into your mid-twenties and haven’t been vaccinated, you should also discuss this vaccine with your physician. You should be encouraged that a simple vaccine can eliminate cervical cancer.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Health Awareness

cervical_health_awareness_month

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and to that end, The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) boldly proclaims “No woman should die of cervical cancer.”
It’s cervical health month in the United States, and this point has a rather simple message: Cervical cancer is highly preventable and can be cured when discovered and treatment early. Here are some quick tips to help you check this off of your list of concerns.

  • Every child should get vaccinated at age 11 or 12. Even if you’ve reached age 26 and haven’t been vaccinated, you should discuss options with your physician.
  • The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to get screened regularly starting at age 21.

pap smear

  • The Pap test (or smear) should be performed regularly at age 21. It looks for precancerous changes to the cervix that identify the need for early treatment. In many cases a normal test will eliminate the need for another test for the next three years, but your physician will discuss your individual circumstances in this regard.
  • The HPV test looks for the virus that is now known to be the cause of cervical cancer. Furthermore, human papillomavirus (HPV) is sexually transmitted. The HPV test can be done at the same time as the Pap test from the same examination.

Hopefully knowing these simple tools will convince you to be attentive to preventing and managing your cervical health. This is a public health success story in that cervical cancer could be eliminated if everyone followed the above steps. The rest is up to you.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Cancer – The Sexually Transmitted Cancer

cervical-cancer-awareness

Let’s put this take home message up front: here’s a pretty good demonstration of the value of vaccines. I hope that each of you resolves to get any children you care for vaccinated before they become sexually active.
I want to thank my friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Ellis, noted Ob/Gyn physician for contributing to this post. Let’s start this with two simple statements:

  • Cervical cancer has basically been shown to be caused by an infection.
  • There soon will be no reason that anyone has to have cervical cancer.

female reproductive system

As a reminder, the cervix is the lower and narrow end of the uterus that connects the vagina to the upper part of the uterus (i.e. the womb). Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the US.
In 2011 (the most recent year numbers are available):

  • 12,109 women in the United States were diagnosed with cervical cancer.
  • 4,092 women in the United States died from cervical cancer.

Fortunately, over the last 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly, largely due to Pap tests. The even better news is the opportunity exists to virtually eradicate the disease. Cervical cancer is highly preventable because screening tests and a vaccine to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are available. When cervical cancer is found early, it is highly treatable and associated with long survival and good quality of life.

HPV oral

Yes, cervical cancer is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), and the most common STI is now known to be caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of you will recognize HPV as a cause of genital warts. This means if you ever develop warts, go get checked immediately (another good reason to do this is because genital syphilis may also present as warts). Even more importantly, certain HPV strains have been shown to cause virtually all cervical and anal cancers. HPV also causes some cancers of the vagina, penis, and oropharynx (a certain part of the throat—and yes, this is what Michael Douglas was referencing about having obtained throat cancer by performing oral sex).
Early on, cervical cancer may not cause signs and symptoms, but advanced cervical cancer may cause bleeding or discharge from the vagina, either of which may be persistent or abnormal from similar episodes you’ve had in the past. If you have any of these signs, see your physician for an evaluation of this and other possible causes of these symptoms.
Am I at risk for HPV? How do you get this?

HPV STD

Everyone having sex or who has ever had sex is at risk for HPV. In fact, nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex, but also through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact without intercourse. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners even if and when the infected person has no signs or symptoms. It’s important to know there’s a big difference between obtaining the HPV virus and obtaining cancer from having the HPV virus.
If I get genital warts, will I get cancer?

HPV genital warts

Not necessarily, but the possibility is high enough that you need to get treated. Most HPV infections actually resolve on their own. It’s the ones that linger that pose particular concern.
If I do have warts, what increases my risks for these cancers?

hpv risks

Smoking, a weakened immune system, having had many children (for increased risk of cervical cancer), long-term oral contraceptive use (for increased risk of cervical cancer), and poor oral hygiene (for increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer) all increase the risk for developing cancer after a HPV infection.
How do I get this and how do I prevent it?

HPV

The most reliable way to prevent infection with HPV is abstinence, avoiding any skin-to-skin oral, anal, or genital contact with another. If you are sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent HPV infection. However, because of the lack of symptoms, it’s hard to know whether a partner is currently infected with HPV. Use of condoms reduces the transmission of HPV between partners, although areas not covered by a condom can still be infected.

HPV vaccine

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two HPV vaccines, branded as Gardasil (for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in these areas) and Cervarix (for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV). Both vaccines are highly effective, but neither has been approved for prevention of penile or oropharyngeal cancer. And yes, it’s safe and effective as young as age 9, although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends vaccination between ages 11–14. You must contact your physician for additional details on these important medications.
How do I treat HPV infections?
There’s no treatment for HPV itself, but the problems HPV causes can be treated. We’ll address the two major ones:

  • Genital warts may be treated topically by you or a healthcare provider. If not treated, they may multiply, go away, or stay the same.
  • Cervical cancer may be treated by your gynecologist, but be warned: Prevention is best, and early detection gives you the best chance for the best outcomes. Continue those annual exams.

There will soon come a time when all boys and girls are receiving vaccinations at around ages 11–12, and cervical cancer (in particular) will become a rare entity. That only happens if you get your family immunized. The science is in. There’s no good reasons left to wait.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser In The News: Success Eliminating Cervical Cancer with the HPV Vaccine

hpv-img-2-lg

In the news is information about the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, used to prevent sexually transmitted infections causing genital warts, and more importantly, causing cervical, anal, penile, mouth and throat cancers. Of particular interest is information demonstrating the vaccine developed to prevent HPV infections is even more effective that thought.
Federal researchers from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) note that existing use of the vaccine has reduced the presence of the virus in teenage girls by approximately two-thirds. This information is especially impressive given the relative novelty and limited use of the vaccine. Only about 40% of girls and 20% of boys between ages 13-17 have been vaccinated. The better news for the future is public health professionals are making a significant push for greater vaccine use at ages 11-12, when the vaccination rates for other childhood diseases exceed 80%.

hpv_vaccine_cancer_prevention

Here’s a public health message: taking the vaccine is about cancer prevention, not just preventing a sexually transmitted infection (genital warts). Unfortunately this message hasn’t fully penetrated the national dialogue: only the District of Columbia, Rhode Island and Virginia require the HPV vaccine, even though it is believed universal use of the vaccine would virtually eradicate cervical cancer. As a frame of reference, several other countries (e.g. Australia) in which HPV vaccine use is mandatory, has achieved over 90% vaccination rates over 90% reduction in rates of genital warts.
About 14 million Americans become infected with HPV each year, and approximately 27,000 people get cancer as a result of an infection from HPV. The American Cancer Society estimates that 4,120 women will die of cervical cancer this year.
If you have a child of either sex, have the conversation with your pediatrician or primary care physician about the HPV vaccine as early as age 10. If you’re a female into your mid-twenties and haven’t been vaccinated, you should also discuss this vaccine with your physician. You should be encouraged that a simple vaccine can eliminate cervical cancer.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Cervical Health Awareness

cervical_health_awareness_month

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month, and to that end, The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) boldly proclaims “No woman should die of cervical cancer.”
It’s cervical health month in the United States, and this point has a rather simple message: Cervical cancer is highly preventable and can be cured when discovered and treatment early. Here are some quick tips to help you check this off of your list of concerns.

  • Every child should get vaccinated at age 11 or 12. Even if you’ve reached age 26 and haven’t been vaccinated, you should discuss options with your physician.
  • The most important thing you can do to help prevent cervical cancer is to get screened regularly starting at age 21.

pap smear

  • The Pap test (or smear) should be performed regularly at age 21. It looks for precancerous changes to the cervix that identify the need for early treatment. In many cases a normal test will eliminate the need for another test for the next three years, but your physician will discuss your individual circumstances in this regard.
  • The HPV test looks for the virus that is now known to be the cause of cervical cancer. Furthermore, human papillomavirus (HPV) is sexually transmitted. The HPV test can be done at the same time as the Pap test from the same examination.

Hopefully knowing these simple tools will convince you to be attentive to preventing and managing your cervical health. This is a public health success story in that cervical cancer could be eliminated if everyone followed the above steps. The rest is up to you.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Straight, No Chaser: Gynecological Cancer Awareness

Gyne cancers

September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness month, and the challenge is to become empowered through knowledge in an effort to avoid becoming a victim. Consider this post your “essentials” for awareness and prevention. The group of gynecologic cancers include cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal and vulvar. This Straight, No Chaser will provide a quick overview on the three most common types (uterine, cervical and ovarian cancers) and will be followed by posts on each.

Gynecologic-Cancer-Projections-chart_800x462

General considerations:

  • All women are at risk for gynecologic cancers.
  • Generally, risk increases with age.
  • Treatment is most effective after early detection.

gyne cancer female reproductive system

Cervical cancer:

  • How you get it – It is thought to be caused by a virus named the Human Papilloma Virus.
  • How you address it – It is preventable if you get vaccinated before you become sexually active, and risk is lowered by not smoking. Detection occurs by Pap smears as recommended by your gynecologist or family doctor.
  • What to look for – There are usually no early symptoms, although you should be alarmed by the presence of bleeding after intercourse or between menstrual periods, or by the presence of excessive and persistent vaginal discharge.

Uterine/Endometrial Cancer (the most common gynecological cancer)

  • How you get it – Family histories of endometrial or colon cancers are important contributors to subsequent development of uterine cancer. Additional risk factors are the use of estrogen alone or use of the drug tamoxifen. Uterine cancer usually occurs around menopause.
  • How you address it – Your best bet is to reduce your risk by managing your weight and keeping blood pressure and blood sugar under control. You must be diligent here; routine Pap tests do not detect uterine cancer.
  • What to look for – Vaginal bleeding after menopause or the presence of irregular or very heavy bleeding in younger women could be signs.

Ovarian Cancer

  • How you get it – Risk factors notably include increasing age and obesity. Protective considerations include early use of birth control pills and carrying a pregnancy to term delivery by age 26.
  • How you address it – You really must have a conversation with your physician about ovarian cancer. There is no screening exam or test for it. Your best protection is to learn and reduce the risks, and you should promptly seek evaluation in the presence of symptoms.
  • What to look for – Symptoms can be easily attributed to other problems. If symptoms persist for more than a few weeks, don’t delay getting evaluated. Such symptoms include bloating, abdominal or pelvic pain, difficulty eating or quick sensations of feeling full and urinary frequency or urgency.

gynecologic_cancer_awareness_month_v3_card-p137711908862306718envwi_400

Although these are topics that you likely would prefer not to think about, they represent disease that you really don’t want to endure, so learn the risks, lower them through prevention and keep your regularly scheduled appointments. If you develop one of these cancers and get detected early, you’ll be very glad you took these simple steps.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, AmazonBarnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright, Sterling Initiatives, LLC. 2013-2015

Straight, No Chaser: Gynecological Cancer Awareness

Gyne cancers

September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness month, and the challenge is to become empowered through knowledge in an effort to avoid becoming a victim. Consider this post your “essentials” for awareness and prevention. The group of gynecologic cancers include cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal and vulvar. This Straight, No Chaser will provide a quick overview on the three most common types (uterine, cervical and ovarian cancers) and will be followed by posts on each.

Gynecologic-Cancer-Projections-chart_800x462

General considerations:

  • All women are at risk for gynecologic cancers.
  • Generally, risk increases with age.
  • Treatment is most effective after early detection.

gyne cancer female reproductive system

Cervical cancer:

  • How you get it – It is thought to be caused by a virus named the Human Papilloma Virus.
  • How you address it – It is preventable if you get vaccinated before you become sexually active, and risk is lowered by not smoking. Detection occurs by Pap smears as recommended by your gynecologist or family doctor.
  • What to look for – There are usually no early symptoms, although you should be alarmed by the presence of bleeding after intercourse or between menstrual periods, or by the presence of excessive and persistent vaginal discharge.

Uterine/Endometrial Cancer (the most common gynecological cancer)

  • How you get it – Family histories of endometrial or colon cancers are important contributors to subsequent development of uterine cancer. Additional risk factors are the use of estrogen alone or use of the drug tamoxifen. Uterine cancer usually occurs around menopause.
  • How you address it – Your best bet is to reduce your risk by managing your weight and keeping blood pressure and blood sugar under control. You must be diligent here; routine Pap tests do not detect uterine cancer.
  • What to look for – Vaginal bleeding after menopause or the presence of irregular or very heavy bleeding in younger women could be signs.

Ovarian Cancer

  • How you get it – Risk factors notably include increasing age and obesity. Protective considerations include early use of birth control pills and carrying a pregnancy to term delivery by age 26.
  • How you address it – You really must have a conversation with your physician about ovarian cancer. There is no screening exam or test for it. Your best protection is to learn and reduce the risks, and you should promptly seek evaluation in the presence of symptoms.
  • What to look for – Symptoms can be easily attributed to other problems. If symptoms persist for more than a few weeks, don’t delay getting evaluated. Such symptoms include bloating, abdominal or pelvic pain, difficulty eating or quick sensations of feeling full and urinary frequency or urgency.

gynecologic_cancer_awareness_month_v3_card-p137711908862306718envwi_400

Although these are topics that you likely would prefer not to think about, they represent disease that you really don’t want to endure, so learn the risks, lower them through prevention and keep your regularly scheduled appointments. If you develop one of these cancers and get detected early, you’ll be very glad you took these simple steps.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offer. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress.

Straight, No Chaser: The Sexually Transmitted Cancer

HPV

I want to thank my friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Ellis, noted Ob/Gyn physician for contributing to this post. Let’s start this with two simple statements:

  • Cervical cancer has basically been shown to be caused by an infection.
  • There soon will be no reason that anyone has to have cervical cancer.

The most common sexually transmitted infection is now caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of you will recognize HPV as a cause of genital warts. (Secondary syphilis is another cause. This means if you ever develop warts, go get checked immediately.)
Even more importantly, certain HPV strains have been shown to cause virtually all cervical and anal cancers. HPV also causes some cancers of the vagina, penis, and oropharynx (a certain part of the throat—and yes, this is what Michael Douglas was referencing about having obtained throat cancer by performing oral sex).
Let’s address this topic in Q&A format:
1) Am I at risk for HPV? How do you get this?
Everyone having sex or who has ever had sex is at risk for HPV. In fact, nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex, but also through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact without intercourse. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners even if and when the infected person has no signs or symptoms.
2) If I get genital warts, will I get cancer?
Not necessarily, but the possibility is high enough that you need to get treated. Most HPV infections actually resolve on their own. It’s the ones that linger that are the concerns.
3) If I do have warts, what increases my risks for these cancers?
Smoking, a weakened immune system, having had many children (for increased risk of cervical cancer), long-term oral contraceptive use (for increased risk of cervical cancer), and poor oral hygiene (for increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer) all increase the risk for developing cancer after an HPV infection.
4) How do I get this and how do I prevent it?
The most reliable way to prevent infection with HPV is abstinence, avoiding any skin-to-skin oral, anal, or genital contact with another. If you are sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent HPV infection. However, because of the lack of symptoms, it’s hard to know whether a partner is currently infected with HPV. Use of condoms reduces the transmission of HPV between partners, although areas not covered by a condom can still be infected.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two HPV vaccines, branded as Gardasil (for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in these areas) and Cervarix (for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV). Both vaccines are highly effective, but neither has been approved for prevention of penile or oropharyngeal cancer. And yes, it’s safe and effective as young as age 9, although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends vaccination between ages 11–14. You must contact your physician for additional details on these important medications.
5) How do I treat HPV infections?
There’s no treatment for HPV itself, but the problems HPV causes can be treated. We’ll address the two major ones:

  • Genital warts may be treated topically by you or a healthcare provider. If not treated, they may multiply, go away, or stay the same.
  • Cervical cancer may be treated by your gynecologist, but be warned: Prevention is best, and early detection gives you the best chance for the best outcomes. Continue those annual exams.

There will soon come a time when all boys and girls are receiving vaccinations at around ages 11–12, and cervical cancer (in particular) will become a rare entity. That only happens if you get your family immunized. The science is in. There’s no good reasons left to wait.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) will offer beginning November 1. Until then enjoy some our favorite posts and frequently asked questions as well as a daily note explaining the benefits of SMA membership. Please share our page with your Friends on WordPress, and we can be found on Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2013 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: The Sexually Transmitted Cancer

HPV
I want to thank my friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Ellis, noted Ob/Gyn physician for contributing to this post. Let’s start this with two simple statements:

  • Cervical cancer has basically been shown to be caused by an infection.
  • There soon will be no reason that anyone has to have cervical cancer.

The most common sexually transmitted infection is now caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Some of you will recognize HPV as a cause of genital warts. (Secondary syphilis is another cause. This means if you ever develop warts, go get checked immediately.)
Even more importantly, certain HPV strains have been shown to cause virtually all cervical and anal cancers. HPV also causes some cancers of the vagina, penis, and oropharynx (a certain part of the throat—and yes, this is what Michael Douglas was referencing about having obtained throat cancer by performing oral sex).
Let’s address this topic in Q&A format:
1) Am I at risk for HPV? How do you get this?
Everyone having sex or who has ever had sex is at risk for HPV. In fact, nearly all sexually active men and women get it at some point in their lives. HPV is passed on through genital contact, most often during vaginal and anal sex, but also through oral sex and genital-to-genital contact without intercourse. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partners even if and when the infected person has no signs or symptoms.
2) If I get genital warts, will I get cancer?
Not necessarily, but the possibility is high enough that you need to get treated. Most HPV infections actually resolve on their own. It’s the ones that linger that are the concerns.
3) If I do have warts, what increases my risks for these cancers?
Smoking, a weakened immune system, having had many children (for increased risk of cervical cancer), long-term oral contraceptive use (for increased risk of cervical cancer), and poor oral hygiene (for increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer) all increase the risk for developing cancer after an HPV infection.
4) How do I get this and how do I prevent it?
The most reliable way to prevent infection with HPV is abstinence, avoiding any skin-to-skin oral, anal, or genital contact with another. If you are sexually active, a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with an uninfected partner is the strategy most likely to prevent HPV infection. However, because of the lack of symptoms, it’s hard to know whether a partner is currently infected with HPV. Use of condoms reduces the transmission of HPV between partners, although areas not covered by a condom can still be infected.
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two HPV vaccines, branded as Gardasil (for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar, and vaginal cancer, precancerous lesions, and genital warts in these areas) and Cervarix (for the prevention of cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions caused by HPV). Both vaccines are highly effective, but neither has been approved for prevention of penile or oropharyngeal cancer. And yes, it’s safe and effective as young as age 9, although the Center for Disease Control and Prevention currently recommends vaccination between ages 11–14. You must contact your physician for additional details on these important medications.
5) How do I treat HPV infections?
There’s no treatment for HPV itself, but the problems HPV causes can be treated. We’ll address the two major ones:

  • Genital warts may be treated topically by you or a healthcare provider. If not treated, they may multiply, go away, or stay the same.
  • Cervical cancer may be treated by your gynecologist, but be warned: Prevention is best, and early detection gives you the best chance for the best outcomes. Continue those annual exams.

There will soon come a time when all boys and girls are receiving vaccinations at around ages 11–12, and cervical cancer (in particular) will become a rare entity. That only happens if you get your family immunized. The science is in. There’s no good reasons left to wait.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) will offer beginning November 1. Until then enjoy some our favorite posts and frequently asked questions as well as a daily note explaining the benefits of SMA membership. Please share our page with your Friends on WordPress, and we can be found on Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2013 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress