Tag Archives: benzodiazepines

Straight, No Chaser: Sedative (Sleeping and Anxiety Pill) Abuse

Recent Straight, No Chaser posts have focused on the scope of the danger of medicines and other drugs/chemicals you keep around your home. These substances are because of the inclination of kids to get into these medicines. Although that occurs with a higher frequency with some drugs, anything in your home is subject to being abused or misused.

sedative benzos-2

As an example, most homes have some medications (prescription, herbal or otherwise) that are used as sleep aids. Here are some frequently asked questions on prescription sedative medications used to facilitate sleep (sleeping pills) and reduce anxiety (anxiolytics).

sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

How do sedatives work?
The short answer is they work by depressing the function of the central nervous system (CNS). If you stopped right there and thought about just that one fact, it’s relatively easy to see how dangerous these drugs can be if misused or abused.

 sedative ambien

What types of medicines are we describing?
Examples of CNS depressants include benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax and barbiturates such as Nembutal.

 sedative abuse_addiction

What are the acute effects of these medications?
They predictably produce drowsiness and relaxation. The CNS depression can lead to a loss of function during an overdose.

sedative MJ

Are there long-term effects associated with sedatives?
The effects about which you should be most concerned are the development of tolerance (diminished effectiveness at the same dose occurring over time), physical dependence (a physiologic need for the substance by the body) and addiction.

 sedative and alcohol addiction_benzodiazepine_klonopin

What happens when sedatives are taken with alcohol?
The combined effects of these drugs results in a slowed heart rate and slowed respiratory rate, which is an enhancement of the CNS depressant effect. Either of these effects can be fatal.

sedative barbituates-infographic-640

You mentioned addiction. Does that mean there are withdrawal symptoms if I try to stop?
If you are addicted to sedatives, controlled detoxification is recommended. Abrupt stoppage of barbiturate usage can be life-threatening. Other serious symptoms that are seen when trying to stop sedative use include seizures.
So how is sedative addiction treated?
Gradual tapering under medical supervision is recommended to avoid the various consequences of abrupt stoppage. Medications as well as behavioral therapies are important parts of treating addiction.

 sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

Aren’t there newer sleep medications on the markets? How are they different?
Yes, there are new products on the market that aren’t in the benzodiazepine class, meaning they don’t have the same side effect, abuse or addiction profile as earlier medications. Unfortunately the story to be told with these newer medications is ER visits associated with inappropriate use is on the rise. As is too often the case, any drug or substance will be tested by those inclined to see what effects the drug may produce when ingested or injected in ways not recommended.
Be sure to learn non-medication dependent means of relaxation and getting to sleep. These medications can cause a lot of harm in the wrong hands, including yours.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis and Treatment

ptsdpic
Review this previous Straight, No Chaser post for a review of PTSD signs, symptoms and those at risk.
Fortunately, not every traumatized person develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In those that do, symptoms typically begin within three months of the incident but may present years afterward. The severity of symptoms is such that they must last more than a month to be considered PTSD. There is significant variation in outcome in those with PTSD; some recover within six months, and in some the condition becomes chronic.
To be diagnosed with PTSD, a person must have the following symptom complex for at least one month:

  • At least one re-experiencing symptom (including flashbacks, scary thoughts or nightmares)
  • At least three avoidance symptoms (a pathologic response to stay away from or forget the episode)
  • At least two hyperarousal symptoms (a constant state of being on edge, sensitive and prone to overreact)

Additionally, PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or other anxiety disorders.

PTSD cognitive-behavioral-therapy

PTSD is typically treated with either psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), medications, or both. Mental health professionals will review and discuss all treatment options with you prior to initiating therapy, because some people will need to try more than one variety to discover what works for their symptoms.
If someone with PTSD is going through ongoing trauma, such as an abusive relationship, both the PTSD and the current problems need to be treated. Other ongoing problems can include panic disorder, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal feelings.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two medications for treating adults with PTSD, sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil). Both of these medications are also used to treat depression. In PTSD, they help control symptoms such as sadness, worry, anger, and the feeling of numbness inside. Taking these medications often make it easier to go through psychotherapy.
Sometimes people taking these medications have side effects at the beginning of therapy, but they usually go away. Any side effects or unusual reactions should be reported to a doctor immediately. Sometimes the medication dose needs to be reduced or the time of day it is taken needs to be adjusted to help lessen these side effects. The most common side effects of antidepressants like sertraline and paroxetine are the following:

  • Headache
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Sleeplessness or drowsiness
  • Agitation (feeling jittery)
  • Sexual problems (occurs in both sexes), including reduced sex drive and problems having and enjoying sex.

Doctors may also prescribe other types of medications, such as benzodiazepines (commonly used for relaxation and as a sleep aid), antipsychotics and other antidepressants. There is little information on how well these work for people with PTSD.
If you believe you suffer from PTSD, it’s very simple. Please get evaluated, and get the help you need.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2018 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Sedative (Sleeping and Anxiety Pill) Abuse

Recent Straight, No Chaser posts have focused on the scope of the danger of medicines and other drugs/chemicals you keep around your home. These substances are because of the inclination of kids to get into these medicines. Although that occurs with a higher frequency with some drugs, anything in your home is subject to being abused or misused.

sedative benzos-2

As an example, most homes have some medications (prescription, herbal or otherwise) that are used as sleep aids. Here are some frequently asked questions on prescription sedative medications used to facilitate sleep (sleeping pills) and reduce anxiety (anxiolytics).

sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

How do sedatives work?
The short answer is they work by depressing the function of the central nervous system (CNS). If you stopped right there and thought about just that one fact, it’s relatively easy to see how dangerous these drugs can be if misused or abused.

 sedative ambien

What types of medicines are we describing?
Examples of CNS depressants include benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax and barbiturates such as Nembutal.

 sedative abuse_addiction

What are the acute effects of these medications?
They predictably produce drowsiness and relaxation. The CNS depression can lead to a loss of function during an overdose.

sedative MJ

Are there long-term effects associated with sedatives?
The effects about which you should be most concerned are the development of tolerance (diminished effectiveness at the same dose occurring over time), physical dependence (a physiologic need for the substance by the body) and addiction.

 sedative and alcohol addiction_benzodiazepine_klonopin

What happens when sedatives are taken with alcohol?
The combined effects of these drugs results in a slowed heart rate and slowed respiratory rate, which is an enhancement of the CNS depressant effect. Either of these effects can be fatal.

sedative barbituates-infographic-640

You mentioned addiction. Does that mean there are withdrawal symptoms if I try to stop?
If you are addicted to sedatives, controlled detoxification is recommended. Abrupt stoppage of barbiturate usage can be life-threatening. Other serious symptoms that are seen when trying to stop sedative use include seizures.
So how is sedative addiction treated?
Gradual tapering under medical supervision is recommended to avoid the various consequences of abrupt stoppage. Medications as well as behavioral therapies are important parts of treating addiction.

 sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

Aren’t there newer sleep medications on the markets? How are they different?
Yes, there are new products on the market that aren’t in the benzodiazepine class, meaning they don’t have the same side effect, abuse or addiction profile as earlier medications. Unfortunately the story to be told with these newer medications is ER visits associated with inappropriate use is on the rise. As is too often the case, any drug or substance will be tested by those inclined to see what effects the drug may produce when ingested or injected in ways not recommended.
Be sure to learn non-medication dependent means of relaxation and getting to sleep. These medications can cause a lot of harm in the wrong hands, including yours.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis and Treatment

ptsdpic
Review this previous Straight, No Chaser post for a review of PTSD signs, symptoms and those at risk.
Fortunately, not every traumatized person develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In those that do, symptoms typically begin within three months of the incident but may present years afterward. The severity of symptoms is such that they must last more than a month to be considered PTSD. There is significant variation in outcome in those with PTSD; some recover within six months, and in some the condition becomes chronic.
To be diagnosed with PTSD, a person must have the following symptom complex for at least one month:

  • At least one re-experiencing symptom (including flashbacks, scary thoughts or nightmares)
  • At least three avoidance symptoms (a pathologic response to stay away from or forget the episode)
  • At least two hyperarousal symptoms (a constant state of being on edge, sensitive and prone to overreact)

Additionally, PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or other anxiety disorders.

PTSD cognitive-behavioral-therapy

PTSD is typically treated with either psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), medications, or both. Mental health professionals will review and discuss all treatment options with you prior to initiating therapy, because some people will need to try more than one variety to discover what works for their symptoms.
If someone with PTSD is going through ongoing trauma, such as an abusive relationship, both the PTSD and the current problems need to be treated. Other ongoing problems can include panic disorder, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal feelings.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two medications for treating adults with PTSD, sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil). Both of these medications are also used to treat depression. In PTSD, they help control symptoms such as sadness, worry, anger, and the feeling of numbness inside. Taking these medications often make it easier to go through psychotherapy.
Sometimes people taking these medications have side effects at the beginning of therapy, but they usually go away. Any side effects or unusual reactions should be reported to a doctor immediately. Sometimes the medication dose needs to be reduced or the time of day it is taken needs to be adjusted to help lessen these side effects. The most common side effects of antidepressants like sertraline and paroxetine are the following:

  • Headache
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Sleeplessness or drowsiness
  • Agitation (feeling jittery)
  • Sexual problems (occurs in both sexes), including reduced sex drive and problems having and enjoying sex.

Doctors may also prescribe other types of medications, such as benzodiazepines (commonly used for relaxation and as a sleep aid), antipsychotics and other antidepressants. There is little information on how well these work for people with PTSD.
If you believe you suffer from PTSD, it’s very simple. Please get evaluated, and get the help you need.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Take the #72HoursChallenge, and join the community. As a thank you for being a valued subscriber to Straight, No Chaser, we’d like to offer you a complimentary 30-day membership at www.72hourslife.com. Just use the code #NoChaser, and yes, it’s ok if you share!
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new books There are 72 Hours in a Day: Using Efficiency to Better Enjoy Every Part of Your Life and The 72 Hours in a Day Workbook: The Journey to The 72 Hours Life in 72 Days at Amazon or at www.72hourslife.com. Receive introductory pricing with orders!
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2017 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Straight, No Chaser: Sedative (Sleeping and Anxiety Pill) Abuse

Recent Straight, No Chaser posts have focused on the scope of the danger of medicines and other drugs/chemicals you keep around your home. These substances are because of the inclination of kids to get into these medicines. Although that occurs with a higher frequency with some drugs, anything in your home is subject to being abused or misused.

sedative benzos-2

As an example, most homes have some medications (prescription, herbal or otherwise) that are used as sleep aids. Here are some frequently asked questions on prescription sedative medications used to facilitate sleep (sleeping pills) and reduce anxiety (anxiolytics).

sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

How do sedatives work?
The short answer is they work by depressing the function of the central nervous system (CNS). If you stopped right there and thought about just that one fact, it’s relatively easy to see how dangerous these drugs can be if misused or abused.

 sedative ambien

What types of medicines are we describing?
Examples of CNS depressants include benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax and barbiturates such as Nembutal.

 sedative abuse_addiction

What are the acute effects of these medications?
They predictably produce drowsiness and relaxation. The CNS depression can lead to a loss of function during an overdose.

sedative MJ

Are there long-term effects associated with sedatives?
The effects about which you should be most concerned are the development of tolerance (diminished effectiveness at the same dose occurring over time), physical dependence (a physiologic need for the substance by the body) and addiction.

 sedative and alcohol addiction_benzodiazepine_klonopin

What happens when sedatives are taken with alcohol?
The combined effects of these drugs results in a slowed heart rate and slowed respiratory rate, which is an enhancement of the CNS depressant effect. Either of these effects can be fatal.

sedative barbituates-infographic-640

You mentioned addiction. Does that mean there are withdrawal symptoms if I try to stop?
If you are addicted to sedatives, controlled detoxification is recommended. Abrupt stoppage of barbiturate usage can be life-threatening. Other serious symptoms that are seen when trying to stop sedative use include seizures.
So how is sedative addiction treated?
Gradual tapering under medical supervision is recommended to avoid the various consequences of abrupt stoppage. Medications as well as behavioral therapies are important parts of treating addiction.

 sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

Aren’t there newer sleep medications on the markets? How are they different?
Yes, there are new products on the market that aren’t in the benzodiazepine class, meaning they don’t have the same side effect, abuse or addiction profile as earlier medications. Unfortunately the story to be told with these newer medications is ER visits associated with inappropriate use is on the rise. As is too often the case, any drug or substance will be tested by those inclined to see what effects the drug may produce when ingested or injected in ways not recommended.
Be sure to learn non-medication dependent means of relaxation and getting to sleep. These medications can cause a lot of harm in the wrong hands, including yours.
Feel free to ask any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress
 

Straight, No Chaser: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis and Treatment

ptsdpic
Review this previous Straight, No Chaser post for a review of PTSD signs, symptoms and those at risk.
Fortunately, not every traumatized person develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In those that do, symptoms typically begin within three months of the incident but may present years afterward. The severity of symptoms is such that they must last more than a month to be considered PTSD. There is significant variation in outcome in those with PTSD; some recover within six months, and in some the condition becomes chronic.
To be diagnosed with PTSD, a person must have the following symptom complex for at least one month:

  • At least one re-experiencing symptom (including flashbacks, scary thoughts or nightmares)
  • At least three avoidance symptoms (a pathologic response to stay away from or forget the episode)
  • At least two hyperarousal symptoms (a constant state of being on edge, sensitive and prone to overreact)

Additionally, PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or other anxiety disorders.

PTSD cognitive-behavioral-therapy

PTSD is typically treated with either psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), medications, or both. Mental health professionals will review and discuss all treatment options with you prior to initiating therapy, because some people will need to try more than one variety to discover what works for their symptoms.
If someone with PTSD is going through ongoing trauma, such as an abusive relationship, both the PTSD and the current problems need to be treated. Other ongoing problems can include panic disorder, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal feelings.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two medications for treating adults with PTSD, sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil). Both of these medications are also used to treat depression. In PTSD, they help control symptoms such as sadness, worry, anger, and the feeling of numbness inside. Taking these medications often make it easier to go through psychotherapy.
Sometimes people taking these medications have side effects at the beginning of therapy, but they usually go away. Any side effects or unusual reactions should be reported to a doctor immediately. Sometimes the medication dose needs to be reduced or the time of day it is taken needs to be adjusted to help lessen these side effects. The most common side effects of antidepressants like sertraline and paroxetine are the following:

  • Headache
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Sleeplessness or drowsiness
  • Agitation (feeling jittery)
  • Sexual problems (occurs in both sexes), including reduced sex drive and problems having and enjoying sex.

Doctors may also prescribe other types of medications, such as benzodiazepines (commonly used for relaxation and as a sleep aid), antipsychotics and other antidepressants. There is little information on how well these work for people with PTSD.
If you believe you suffer from PTSD, it’s very simple. Please get evaluated, and get the help you need.
Feel free to ask your SMA expert consultant any questions you may have on this topic.
Order your copy of Dr. Sterling’s new book Behind The Curtain: A Peek at Life from within the ER at jeffreysterlingbooks.com, iTunes, Amazon, Barnes and Nobles and wherever books are sold.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2016 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis and Treatment

ptsdpic
Review this previous Straight, No Chaser post for a review of PTSD signs, symptoms and those at risk.
Fortunately, not every traumatized person develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In those that do, symptoms typically begin within three months of the incident but may present years afterward. The severity of symptoms is such that they must last more than a month to be considered PTSD. There is significant variation in outcome in those with PTSD; some recover within six months, and in some the condition becomes chronic.
To be diagnosed with PTSD, a person must have the following symptom complex for at least one month:

  • At least one re-experiencing symptom (including flashbacks, scary thoughts or nightmares)
  • At least three avoidance symptoms (a pathologic response to stay away from or forget the episode)
  • At least two hyperarousal symptoms (a constant state of being on edge, sensitive and prone to overreact)

Additionally, PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or other anxiety disorders.

PTSD cognitive-behavioral-therapy

PTSD is typically treated with either psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), medications, or both. Mental health professionals will review and discuss all treatment options with you prior to initiating therapy, because some people will need to try more than one variety to discover what works for their symptoms.
If someone with PTSD is going through ongoing trauma, such as an abusive relationship, both the PTSD and the current problems need to be treated. Other ongoing problems can include panic disorder, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal feelings.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two medications for treating adults with PTSD, sertraline (Zoloft), and paroxetine (Paxil). Both of these medications are also used to treat depression. In PTSD, they help control symptoms such as sadness, worry, anger, and the feeling of numbness inside. Taking these medications often make it easier to go through psychotherapy.
Sometimes people taking these medications have side effects at the beginning of therapy, but they usually go away. Any side effects or unusual reactions should be reported to a doctor immediately. Sometimes the medication dose needs to be reduced or the time of day it is taken needs to be adjusted to help lessen these side effects. The most common side effects of antidepressants like sertraline and paroxetine are the following:

  • Headache
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Sleeplessness or drowsiness
  • Agitation (feeling jittery)
  • Sexual problems (occurs in both sexes), including reduced sex drive and problems having and enjoying sex.

Doctors may also prescribe other types of medications, such as benzodiazepines (commonly used for relaxation and as a sleep aid), antipsychotics and other antidepressants. There is little information on how well these work for people with PTSD.
If you believe you suffer from PTSD, it’s very simple. Please get evaluated, and get the help you need.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) and 844-SMA-TALK offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress, like us on Facebook @ SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and follow us on Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2015 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC

Straight, No Chaser: Sedative (Sleeping and Anxiety Pill) Abuse

Recent Straight, No Chaser posts have focused on the scope of the danger of medicines and other drugs/chemicals you keep around your home. These substances are because of the inclination of kids to get into these medicines. Although that occurs with a higher frequency with some drugs, anything in your home is subject to being abused or misused.

sedative benzos-2

As an example, most homes have some medications (prescription, herbal or otherwise) that are used as sleep aids. Here are some frequently asked questions on prescription sedative medications used to facilitate sleep (sleeping pills) and reduce anxiety (anxiolytics).

sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

How do sedatives work?
The short answer is they work by depressing the function of the central nervous system (CNS). If you stopped right there and thought about just that one fact, it’s relatively easy to see how dangerous these drugs can be if misused or abused.

 sedative ambien

What types of medicines are we describing?
Examples of CNS depressants include benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax and barbiturates such as Nembutal.

 sedative abuse_addiction

What are the acute effects of these medications?
They predictably produce drowsiness and relaxation. The CNS depression can lead to a loss of function during an overdose.

sedative MJ

Are there long-term effects associated with sedatives?
The effects about which you should be most concerned are the development of tolerance (diminished effectiveness at the same dose occurring over time), physical dependence (a physiologic need for the substance by the body) and addiction.

 sedative and alcohol addiction_benzodiazepine_klonopin

What happens when sedatives are taken with alcohol?
The combined effects of these drugs results in a slowed heart rate and slowed respiratory rate, which is an enhancement of the CNS depressant effect. Either of these effects can be fatal.

sedative barbituates-infographic-640

You mentioned addiction. Does that mean there are withdrawal symptoms if I try to stop?
If you are addicted to sedatives, controlled detoxification is recommended. Abrupt stoppage of barbiturate usage can be life-threatening. Other serious symptoms that are seen when trying to stop sedative use include seizures.
So how is sedative addiction treated?
Gradual tapering under medical supervision is recommended to avoid the various consequences of abrupt stoppage. Medications as well as behavioral therapies are important parts of treating addiction.

 sedative propofol_D_20090806083825

Aren’t there newer sleep medications on the markets? How are they different?
Yes, there are new products on the market that aren’t in the benzodiazepine class, meaning they don’t have the same side effect, abuse or addiction profile as earlier medications. Unfortunately the story to be told with these newer medications is ER visits associated with inappropriate use is on the rise. As is too often the case, any drug or substance will be tested by those inclined to see what effects the drug may produce when ingested or injected in ways not recommended.
Be sure to learn non-medicine means of relaxation and getting to sleep. These medications can cause a lot of harm in the wrong hands, including yours.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what 844-SMA-TALK and http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress. We are also on Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.
Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress

Straight, No Chaser: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Diagnosis and Treatment

ptsdpic
Memorial Day serves to honor our fallen heroes. Part of that involves caring for our soldiers still with us. Understanding and acknowledging the mental components of their suffering remains a vital and underachieved need. Our soldiers disproportionately suffer from several mental disorders, notably, post-traumatic stress disorder. Straight, No Chaser has reviewed various aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder. Today’s post is a review of diagnosis and treatment, and we will link you to other Straight, No Chaser posts on the topic. We thank all of our veterans for their service.

  • For a review of PTSD signs, symptoms and those at risk, click here.
  • For a review of PTSD in communities, click here.
  • For a review of PTSD in children, click here.

Not every traumatized person develops post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In those that do, symptoms typically begin within three months of the incident but may present years afterward. The severity of symptoms is such that they must last more than a month to be considered PTSD. There is significant variation in outcome in those with PTSD; some recover within six months, and in some the condition becomes chronic.
To be diagnosed with PTSD, a person must have the following symptom complex for at least one month:

  • At least one re-experiencing symptom (including flashbacks, scary thoughts or nightmares)
  • At least three avoidance symptoms (a pathologic response to stay away from or forget the episode)
  • At least two hyperarousal symptoms (a constant state of being on edge, sensitive and prone to overreact)

Additionally, PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse or other anxiety disorders.
PTSD is typically treated with either psychotherapy (“talk” therapy), medications or both. Mental health professionals will review and discuss all treatment options prior to initiating therapy, because some people will need to try more than one variety to discover what works for their symptoms.
If someone with PTSD is going through ongoing trauma, such as an abusive relationship, both the PTSD and the current problems need to be treated. Other ongoing problems can include panic disorder, depression, substance abuse and suicidal feelings.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved two medications for treating adults with PTSD, sertraline (Zoloft) and paroxetine (Paxil). Both of these medications are also used to treat depression. In PTSD, they help control symptoms such as sadness, worry, anger and the feeling of numbness inside. Taking these medications often makes it easier to go through psychotherapy.
Sometimes people taking these medications have side effects at the beginning of therapy, but they usually go away. Any side effects or unusual reactions should be reported to a doctor immediately. Sometimes the medication dose needs to be reduced or the time of day it is taken needs to be adjusted to help lessen these side effects. The most common side effects of antidepressants like sertraline and paroxetine are the following:

  • Headache
  • Nausea (feeling sick to your stomach)
  • Sleeplessness or drowsiness
  • Agitation (feeling jittery)
  • Sexual problems (occurs in both sexes), including reduced sex drive and problems having and enjoying sex

Doctors may also prescribe other types of medications, such as benzodiazepines (commonly used for relaxation and as a sleep aid), antipsychotics and other antidepressants. There is little information on how well these work for people with PTSD.
If you believe you suffer from PTSD, please get evaluated and get the help you need.
Thanks for liking and following Straight, No Chaser! This public service provides a sample of what http://www.SterlingMedicalAdvice.com (SMA) offers. Please share our page with your friends on WordPress. We are also on Facebook at SterlingMedicalAdvice.com and Twitter at @asksterlingmd.

Copyright © 2014 · Sterling Initiatives, LLC · Powered by WordPress